Why We Need to Start Drug Education in Grade School

The study authors completed a long term data analysis of almost 5000 youths starting from the early 1990’s, and have examined specifically the age of first experimentation with different substances, and the prevalence of continuing substance use later in life.

The results are unsurprising, and confirm other research done on adolescent drug abuse.

Some of the findings include:

  • Sixty percent of teens who start using marijuana before the age of 15 will still be using the drug 8 years later. Only 20% of teens who start after the age of 19 will continue to use 8 years later.
  • Boys start using drugs earlier, and with more frequency, and are less likely to stop.

The study authors conclude that early in life prevention programs are of paramount importance, and that waiting until kids are in junior high may well be waiting too late. They note that a significant number of kids are trying alcohol at ages of 10 and 11 and that these kids may never, at this age, have been exposed to any drug or alcohol information. They suggest late elementary school grades as a better time to start drug and alcohol educational programming.

The study results also underscore the importance of drug and alcohol education in the family, and starting from a young age. Our kids are starting to experiment earlier than we realize, yet if we can keep them from this early experimentation, they stand a much better chance to avoid the pains of later in life addiction or alcoholism.

The study authors completed a long term data analysis of almost 5000 youths starting from the early 1990’s, and have examined specifically the age of first experimentation with different substances, and the prevalence of continuing substance use later in life.

The results are unsurprising, and confirm other research done on adolescent drug abuse.

Some of the findings include:

  • Sixty percent of teens who start using marijuana before the age of 15 will still be using the drug 8 years later. Only 20% of teens who start after the age of 19 will continue to use 8 years later.
  • Boys start using drugs earlier, and with more frequency, and are less likely to stop.

The study authors conclude that early in life prevention programs are of paramount importance, and that waiting until kids are in junior high may well be waiting too late. They note that a significant number of kids are trying alcohol at ages of 10 and 11 and that these kids may never, at this age, have been exposed to any drug or alcohol information. They suggest late elementary school grades as a better time to start drug and alcohol educational programming.

The study results also underscore the importance of drug and alcohol education in the family, and starting from a young age. Our kids are starting to experiment earlier than we realize, yet if we can keep them from this early experimentation, they stand a much better chance to avoid the pains of later in life addiction or alcoholism.

How to Spot Inhalant Use…Is Your Teen Huffing?

Inhalants can be fatal the first time they are tried, and the long term and irreversible health effects of inhalant abuse are tragic. The really scary part is that the most common abusers of inhalants are our very young kids.

Parents need to be on the lookout for any of the signs of inhalant use, and if any usage is suspected, need to get immediate professional help. More than 17 million Americans have used inhalants at least once.

Inhalants, which are a class of drugs in which the user inhales the vapors of a gas, are incredibly damaging and can be very addictive; and studies report that a whole lot of young people are experimenting with these scary drugs. Inhalants tend to be most widely used by the very young, presumably due to ease of access, and when the drug of choice is located in the closet or in the garage, it’s very convenient for these young people to get a cheap and very intoxicating drug.

Some commonly abused inhalants are paint thinner, shoe shine, turpentine, hair spray, gasoline, glue, and many many others. There is both the risk of immediate cardiac arrest from the use of inhalants, and a very real and very frightening possibility of long term, severe and irreversible cerebral and physical impairments.

Inhalant abuse seems to attack the central nervous system in a way very similar to alcohol, but at an extremely exaggerated pace. It’s very important for parents to be aware of the abuse of inhalants, and also to be aware of the signs that may indicate the usage of this class of drugs.

Some of the signs of inhalant usage are:

  • Chemical odors on the body or clothes
  • Paint or other chemical stains on the face hands or clothes
  • Hidden inhalant paraphernalia (empty spray cans, rags, strong smelling plastic bags)
  • Looking drunk, confused or un coordinated
  • Frequent nausea and a loss of appetite

Because the health effects of these drugs are so severe, and because the most common abusers are our very young kids, parents need to be especially aware of the risks of inhalant abuse, and need to get professional help if they ever suspect that their kids may be abusing inhalants.

Warning signs video

Watch How They Do It

 

Inhalants can be fatal the first time they are tried, and the long term and irreversible health effects of inhalant abuse are tragic. The really scary part is that the most common abusers of inhalants are our very young kids.

Parents need to be on the lookout for any of the signs of inhalant use, and if any usage is suspected, need to get immediate professional help. More than 17 million Americans have used inhalants at least once.

Inhalants, which are a class of drugs in which the user inhales the vapors of a gas, are incredibly damaging and can be very addictive; and studies report that a whole lot of young people are experimenting with these scary drugs. Inhalants tend to be most widely used by the very young, presumably due to ease of access, and when the drug of choice is located in the closet or in the garage, it’s very convenient for these young people to get a cheap and very intoxicating drug.

Some commonly abused inhalants are paint thinner, shoe shine, turpentine, hair spray, gasoline, glue, and many many others. There is both the risk of immediate cardiac arrest from the use of inhalants, and a very real and very frightening possibility of long term, severe and irreversible cerebral and physical impairments.

Inhalant abuse seems to attack the central nervous system in a way very similar to alcohol, but at an extremely exaggerated pace. It’s very important for parents to be aware of the abuse of inhalants, and also to be aware of the signs that may indicate the usage of this class of drugs.

Some of the signs of inhalant usage are:

  • Chemical odors on the body or clothes
  • Paint or other chemical stains on the face hands or clothes
  • Hidden inhalant paraphernalia (empty spray cans, rags, strong smelling plastic bags)
  • Looking drunk, confused or un coordinated
  • Frequent nausea and a loss of appetite

Because the health effects of these drugs are so severe, and because the most common abusers are our very young kids, parents need to be especially aware of the risks of inhalant abuse, and need to get professional help if they ever suspect that their kids may be abusing inhalants.

Warning signs video

Watch How They Do It