Likelihood of Alcohol Abuse Greater in a Bad Neighborhood

Getting help is never a “dollars and cents” issue…but when you look at the economic impact of continuing abuse, treatment always makes sense.

If you need one more reason to get help for problem drinking, you may find motivation out of a Virginia health care study examining the use of alcohol, and the kind of neighborhood you can expect to live in. Researchers examined hundreds of Caucasian men over a 12 year period, evaluated their alcohol use behaviors, and as well plotted their residences every three years during that 12 year period. They found that heavy use of alcohol over that time was significantly and casually related to a far greater likelihood of residing in a “bad neighborhood” (as defined by low socio economic status).

Contrarily, those people who reversed heavy alcohol consumption were far more likely to move out into better neighborhoods as their length of abstinence progressed. Researchers explain that approximately 40 percent of experienced risk towards alcohol abuse seems to be environmental, and that continuing residency in low socio economic neighborhoods likely further contributes to abuse due to an increase in environmental stressors, negative modeling and lesser access to treatment and social programming.

The Many Costs of Drinking

The researchers conclude that alcohol abuse does not solely diminish health, but it also very negatively impacts on quality of life and socio economic status. Of course not everyone who abuses or is dependent on alcohol lives in a “bad neighborhood” and many successful professionals boasting impressive residences drink far more than is healthy; but on a societal level, alcohol abuse and dependency seems very closely linked with greater poverty and downward social mobility.

Alcohol abusers don’t perform as well at work, are more likely to be fired, and more likely to suffer health problems related to abuse that reduce their employment potential…also, alcohol can be expensive when consumed in the kind of quantities a serious alcoholic needs.

My family never needed to move out of the family home, but we certainly suffered economically during my period of alcohol and drug abuse. I held down a job, but I certainly didn’t excel, and nearly lost it a number of times (should really have lost it) and we were lucky to have done as well as we did. People should never look at the cost of treatment as a barrier to access, and you just need to find the best drug or alcohol treatment that you can possibly afford, and consider it an investment in the future.

It worked for me, and my family is far more comfortable now that my attentions are not so firmly focused on intoxication…and it seems that research backs up my experience. Continuing abuse always leads to destruction on many levels, and you are far less likely to enjoy a good neighborhood, live on safe streets, and send your kids to quality schools while continuing to use and abuse alcohol or drugs.

Why people who go red faced after a drink or two rarely become alcoholics!!! Genetic variations in the metabolism of alcohol

A person’s genetically predetermined efficiency for alcohol metabolism factors into a predisposition for the development of alcoholism.

Alcoholism is a both a genetically expressed hereditary disease, and also a disease profoundly influenced by environmental variables. The genetic component for a predisposition to alcoholism is not yet entirely understood, but researchers have linked certain gene expression differences (that influence the metabolism of alcohol) with a decreased risk of developing alcoholism.

Contrarily, although these same people enjoy a reduction of risk to the expression of the disease, those that do drink heavily seem to suffer more severely from their consumption. Certain groups of people share a common enzymatic gene expression that leads to inefficiency in metabolizing alcohol. This makes the consumption of alcohol less pleasant, and also more harmful.

How is alcohol metabolized in the body?

Ethanol –>acetaldehyde–>acetate–> water and carbon dioxide

Ethanol (Alcohol) as consumed in the body goes through two enzymatic transitions before it is completely metabolized out of the body. Ethanol is first broken down into the enzyme acetaldehyde, and then further broken down into the enzyme acetate, which can be in turn reduced to water and carbon dioxide for expulsion from the body. Acetate is relatively harmless and inactive, but acetaldehyde is a toxic and very active substance and is a known carcinogen. The intermediate stage at which ethanol is transformed to acetaldehyde is brief, but with enough exposure, this acetaldehyde can influence the development of cancers of the mouth, esophagus, the digestive tract, the pancreas, liver and the breast.

Genetic differences in the metabolism of ethanol

Certain groups of people, most notably many people of a Korean, Chinese and Japanese decent enjoy a genetic expression that protects them from alcoholism, but that increases the harm of heavy drinking if it does occur. The metabolism from ethanol through acetaldehyde to acetate generally happens quickly; and the quicker the acetaldehyde is metabolized into acetate, the less harmful the consumption of alcohol and the more enjoyable the consumption.

Certain groups of people endure a contrasting efficiency and then inefficiency in the breakdown of alcohol. That is they can transition ethanol into acetaldehyde relatively quickly, but are slow to convert acetaldehyde into acetate. These people tend to exhibit a reddened and flushed face after a small amount of drinking and are also more prone to experienced nausea and a weakened and quickened heart rate after drinking. The act of drinking is far less pleasant, and as such, people with this particular gene expression don’t tend to drink as heavily, and suffer far lower probabilities of developing alcoholism.

If people with this particular genetic expression do continue to drink through the negative experienced symptoms, they can develop alcohol abuse problems and dependencies just as readily as the general population, but since their bodies are exposed to the toxic and carcinogenic acetaldehyde for far longer, these people are at a greatly increased risk for certain cancers and other negative long term health risks associated with chronic alcohol consumption.

The red faced warning!!!

If you or a loved one is one of those easy to spot drinkers who go fire engine red after a drink or two, you should be especially cautious of heavy alcohol consumption. If you think that you may be inefficiently metabolizing alcohol, yet do drink heavily; you do need to cut down on your drinking, and get professional intervention and treatment if needed. Alcohol abuse is destructive for anyone, but for people who do not process acetaldehyde well, it is particularly devastating.

A person’s genetically predetermined efficiency for alcohol metabolism factors into a predisposition for the development of alcoholism.

Alcoholism is a both a genetically expressed hereditary disease, and also a disease profoundly influenced by environmental variables. The genetic component for a predisposition to alcoholism is not yet entirely understood, but researchers have linked certain gene expression differences (that influence the metabolism of alcohol) with a decreased risk of developing alcoholism.

Contrarily, although these same people enjoy a reduction of risk to the expression of the disease, those that do drink heavily seem to suffer more severely from their consumption. Certain groups of people share a common enzymatic gene expression that leads to inefficiency in metabolizing alcohol. This makes the consumption of alcohol less pleasant, and also more harmful.

How is alcohol metabolized in the body?

Ethanol –>acetaldehyde–>acetate–> water and carbon dioxide

Ethanol (Alcohol) as consumed in the body goes through two enzymatic transitions before it is completely metabolized out of the body. Ethanol is first broken down into the enzyme acetaldehyde, and then further broken down into the enzyme acetate, which can be in turn reduced to water and carbon dioxide for expulsion from the body. Acetate is relatively harmless and inactive, but acetaldehyde is a toxic and very active substance and is a known carcinogen. The intermediate stage at which ethanol is transformed to acetaldehyde is brief, but with enough exposure, this acetaldehyde can influence the development of cancers of the mouth, esophagus, the digestive tract, the pancreas, liver and the breast.

Genetic differences in the metabolism of ethanol

Certain groups of people, most notably many people of a Korean, Chinese and Japanese decent enjoy a genetic expression that protects them from alcoholism, but that increases the harm of heavy drinking if it does occur. The metabolism from ethanol through acetaldehyde to acetate generally happens quickly; and the quicker the acetaldehyde is metabolized into acetate, the less harmful the consumption of alcohol and the more enjoyable the consumption.

Certain groups of people endure a contrasting efficiency and then inefficiency in the breakdown of alcohol. That is they can transition ethanol into acetaldehyde relatively quickly, but are slow to convert acetaldehyde into acetate. These people tend to exhibit a reddened and flushed face after a small amount of drinking and are also more prone to experienced nausea and a weakened and quickened heart rate after drinking. The act of drinking is far less pleasant, and as such, people with this particular gene expression don’t tend to drink as heavily, and suffer far lower probabilities of developing alcoholism.

If people with this particular genetic expression do continue to drink through the negative experienced symptoms, they can develop alcohol abuse problems and dependencies just as readily as the general population, but since their bodies are exposed to the toxic and carcinogenic acetaldehyde for far longer, these people are at a greatly increased risk for certain cancers and other negative long term health risks associated with chronic alcohol consumption.

The red faced warning!!!

If you or a loved one is one of those easy to spot drinkers who go fire engine red after a drink or two, you should be especially cautious of heavy alcohol consumption. If you think that you may be inefficiently metabolizing alcohol, yet do drink heavily; you do need to cut down on your drinking, and get professional intervention and treatment if needed. Alcohol abuse is destructive for anyone, but for people who do not process acetaldehyde well, it is particularly devastating.