Are the French Smarter Than Us? On Alcohol Advertising They Sure Are

You can tell the world about your product, about why it tastes better or about how it was made, but in France at least, if you’re selling alcohol, that’s about all you can say.

You cannot imply that drinking makes life more fun. You cannot imply that alcohol is cool, or sophisticated or stylish or worldly and you cannot imply that by drinking alcohol you will become better looking, more likable or successful. In short, everything that American alcohol advertisers do – they cannot.

And the French enforce it too, recent rulings against Heineken and Moet Champagne for minor transgressions shows the teeth in this legislation of public health promotion.

And they’re smart to do so, as studies consistently and conclusively show that alcohol advertising does predispose kids to drink, and helps people feel OK about drinking to excess.

We shouldn’t ban alcohol advertising, but this time – the French have hit a home run, and we should have the courage to follow in their footsteps.

You can tell the world about your product, about why it tastes better or about how it was made, but in France at least, if you’re selling alcohol, that’s about all you can say.

You cannot imply that drinking makes life more fun. You cannot imply that alcohol is cool, or sophisticated or stylish or worldly and you cannot imply that by drinking alcohol you will become better looking, more likable or successful. In short, everything that American alcohol advertisers do – they cannot.

And the French enforce it too, recent rulings against Heineken and Moet Champagne for minor transgressions shows the teeth in this legislation of public health promotion.

And they’re smart to do so, as studies consistently and conclusively show that alcohol advertising does predispose kids to drink, and helps people feel OK about drinking to excess.

We shouldn’t ban alcohol advertising, but this time – the French have hit a home run, and we should have the courage to follow in their footsteps.

Alcoholics; Lets Lock Them Up – Seriously

At the end of the day – whether or not a person wants to drink too much, or use drugs, is pretty much a personal decision – right? It’s their body, it’s their life – it’s their decision.

Maybe – it’s certainly something that a concerned family may hear when attempting to convince an addict to get help. It’s certainly something someone trapped in the self-delusion of the disease might spout – and even believe.

 But is it true?

If you drink alone, hermit like in a remote cabin, never seeing another soul – then OK, it’s your business. You hurt no one but yourself, and it’s no one’s business but yours.

So alcoholic hermits aside…

  • If you drink to a stupor each night in front of your family, in front of your kids – even if you do no immediate wrongs – you model something terrible. Do you have the right? Does it become the family’s business at that point?
  • If your substance use prevents you from getting or keeping a job, from providing for yourself and your family – do those that would subsidize your existence have the right to tell you what you can and cannot put in your body?

We live together, as family, as a community, and our actions and choices affect those around us. Those that drink or drug heavily impact the rest of us, whether painfully in the family, or through social costs in the community. We have the right to demand change – it is our business, it’s everyone’s business.

We don’t have the right to demand impossible change though. Addiction is a disease, entrenched and enduring, and you can’t just will it away. We can demand change in the family, we can demand change in the community, but first, we must provide a means for change.

We, as a society, can say that alcoholic level drinking is unacceptable. It does harm to more than just the individual, and we are not going to stand for it anymore. We can divert some of the ludicrous quantities of money going into our prison system (we now incarcerate 1 in 100) and build 1000 new treatment centers – and we can make people use them. If we can put someone in jail for the possession of a small quantity of crack – why can’t we save through enforced healthcare those that would abuse even legal drugs, such as alcohol?

It would save money in the long run – it would save lives right away. Sure it’s an ethical minefield, and committing people to hospitals does sound a bit scary – a bit too "One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest" for comfort. It wouldn’t be easy. But we could do it and maybe we should.

At the end of the day – whether or not a person wants to drink too much, or use drugs, is pretty much a personal decision – right? It’s their body, it’s their life – it’s their decision.

Maybe – it’s certainly something that a concerned family may hear when attempting to convince an addict to get help. It’s certainly something someone trapped in the self-delusion of the disease might spout – and even believe.

 But is it true?

If you drink alone, hermit like in a remote cabin, never seeing another soul – then OK, it’s your business. You hurt no one but yourself, and it’s no one’s business but yours.

So alcoholic hermits aside…

  • If you drink to a stupor each night in front of your family, in front of your kids – even if you do no immediate wrongs – you model something terrible. Do you have the right? Does it become the family’s business at that point?
  • If your substance use prevents you from getting or keeping a job, from providing for yourself and your family – do those that would subsidize your existence have the right to tell you what you can and cannot put in your body?

We live together, as family, as a community, and our actions and choices affect those around us. Those that drink or drug heavily impact the rest of us, whether painfully in the family, or through social costs in the community. We have the right to demand change – it is our business, it’s everyone’s business.

We don’t have the right to demand impossible change though. Addiction is a disease, entrenched and enduring, and you can’t just will it away. We can demand change in the family, we can demand change in the community, but first, we must provide a means for change.

We, as a society, can say that alcoholic level drinking is unacceptable. It does harm to more than just the individual, and we are not going to stand for it anymore. We can divert some of the ludicrous quantities of money going into our prison system (we now incarcerate 1 in 100) and build 1000 new treatment centers – and we can make people use them. If we can put someone in jail for the possession of a small quantity of crack – why can’t we save through enforced healthcare those that would abuse even legal drugs, such as alcohol?

It would save money in the long run – it would save lives right away. Sure it’s an ethical minefield, and committing people to hospitals does sound a bit scary – a bit too "One Flew Over the Cuckoos Nest" for comfort. It wouldn’t be easy. But we could do it and maybe we should.

Know When to Say When…To Public Service Beer Ads

Beer companies, all heart, sometimes they care too much.

They worry about us, want us all to drive safe, talk to our kids on the dangers of drink and, gosh darn it, to know when to say when. I’m tired of it. Enough already…the shareholders deserve better!

  • What kind of business retard tries to stop underage drinking? Those kids are great customers. Underage drinkers forked out an estimated 5 billion last year! We need strong CEO’s with vision; marketing execs with the balls to come out and target kids explicitly. Get some furry mascots as brand symbols, talking bears or something – that would probably work…
  • "Know when to say when" – how’s that gonna’ make any money? The hardest drinking 10% chug down almost half of all the beer you can make (43%) – you’ve got to get those guys drinking more, or at least get more people drinking like them! Maybe run a few ads with good looking babes drinking beer and playing volleyball or something.
  • Think when you drink – There’s another profit stinker for you right there. 60% of all beer sold is drunk in binge quantities, hmm – if only we could keep people awake long enough to drink more in a session…HEY, I KNOW – WE COULD PUT CAFFEINE IN THE BEER!!!! Market it like an energy drink or something and kids would love it too!

Enough

For every one ad counseling responsible drinking, there are well over 200 promoting drinking. For every $1 spent on public health ads, $99 are spent on talking bears drinking Bud. Beer companies need young drinkers, they’d die without them. Profits rest almost entirely in the underage, and heavy to alcoholic use consumer – that’s the meat and potatoes of the market, and that’s who they want.

Beer companies just don’t make money by convincing people to drink less beer. We know it and it’s our job to stop them, or at least limit the harms they do; and by allowing them the odd public service ad slot, we allow a platform from which they shellac themselves with respectability. So let’s get rid of these ads, they don’t work anyway; studies have shown that consumers don’t find them effective or influential, and they may well do more harm than good.

Beer companies, all heart, sometimes they care too much.

They worry about us, want us all to drive safe, talk to our kids on the dangers of drink and, gosh darn it, to know when to say when. I’m tired of it. Enough already…the shareholders deserve better!

  • What kind of business retard tries to stop underage drinking? Those kids are great customers. Underage drinkers forked out an estimated 5 billion last year! We need strong CEO’s with vision; marketing execs with the balls to come out and target kids explicitly. Get some furry mascots as brand symbols, talking bears or something – that would probably work…
  • "Know when to say when" – how’s that gonna’ make any money? The hardest drinking 10% chug down almost half of all the beer you can make (43%) – you’ve got to get those guys drinking more, or at least get more people drinking like them! Maybe run a few ads with good looking babes drinking beer and playing volleyball or something.
  • Think when you drink – There’s another profit stinker for you right there. 60% of all beer sold is drunk in binge quantities, hmm – if only we could keep people awake long enough to drink more in a session…HEY, I KNOW – WE COULD PUT CAFFEINE IN THE BEER!!!! Market it like an energy drink or something and kids would love it too!

Enough

For every one ad counseling responsible drinking, there are well over 200 promoting drinking. For every $1 spent on public health ads, $99 are spent on talking bears drinking Bud. Beer companies need young drinkers, they’d die without them. Profits rest almost entirely in the underage, and heavy to alcoholic use consumer – that’s the meat and potatoes of the market, and that’s who they want.

Beer companies just don’t make money by convincing people to drink less beer. We know it and it’s our job to stop them, or at least limit the harms they do; and by allowing them the odd public service ad slot, we allow a platform from which they shellac themselves with respectability. So let’s get rid of these ads, they don’t work anyway; studies have shown that consumers don’t find them effective or influential, and they may well do more harm than good.

You’re Not Funnier When You Drink – Trust Me; You’re Not

There’s a small voice nagging inside the heads of most alcoholics, it’s the voice of addiction, and it tells us what we need to hear to keep on pouring in the booze.

  • It tells us (in whatever words we like to hear) that alcohol isn’t the problem, the job-wife-neighbors-whatever are the problem, and that good old alcohol is the only real solution.
  • It tells us that we don’t have a problem we can’t handle, and if we wanted to quit we could, and that maybe we will someday, but not quite yet, anyway.
  • It also reminds us that until we shoot down stiff drink or two, we’re just not that interesting. Alcohol, it tells us, makes us funnier, better looking – just plain-old more fun to be around.

Of course, it doesn’t, none of this is true – but that’s what we believe.

Maybe it did help to some degree once. Maybe a couple of drinks at that party loosened us up enough to relax, to crack a few jokes, to flirt shamelessly – to be the center of attention. Maybe it did, once, have some effects we liked. But we cling to these memories as if they were fact, all the while not noticing that now, we’re not funny…we’re sloppy. Not noticing that now the only people that really enjoy spending time with us when we’re loaded – are just as loaded as we are, and somehow overlooking what alcohol has been doing to our appearance.

I quit drinking, and now, for the most part, I cringe to remember the ass I made of myself, on so so many occasions. I can tell you that a lot of those people observing the spectacle that was me weren’t thinking about how debonair and charming I was! Oddly, it wasn’t till after I quit drinking that I made this realization.

If you’re an alcoholic, you would be funnier, better company, and surely better looking if you stopped.

That voice inside your head – it’s lying.

 

There’s a small voice nagging inside the heads of most alcoholics, it’s the voice of addiction, and it tells us what we need to hear to keep on pouring in the booze.

  • It tells us (in whatever words we like to hear) that alcohol isn’t the problem, the job-wife-neighbors-whatever are the problem, and that good old alcohol is the only real solution.
  • It tells us that we don’t have a problem we can’t handle, and if we wanted to quit we could, and that maybe we will someday, but not quite yet, anyway.
  • It also reminds us that until we shoot down stiff drink or two, we’re just not that interesting. Alcohol, it tells us, makes us funnier, better looking – just plain-old more fun to be around.

Of course, it doesn’t, none of this is true – but that’s what we believe.

Maybe it did help to some degree once. Maybe a couple of drinks at that party loosened us up enough to relax, to crack a few jokes, to flirt shamelessly – to be the center of attention. Maybe it did, once, have some effects we liked. But we cling to these memories as if they were fact, all the while not noticing that now, we’re not funny…we’re sloppy. Not noticing that now the only people that really enjoy spending time with us when we’re loaded – are just as loaded as we are, and somehow overlooking what alcohol has been doing to our appearance.

I quit drinking, and now, for the most part, I cringe to remember the ass I made of myself, on so so many occasions. I can tell you that a lot of those people observing the spectacle that was me weren’t thinking about how debonair and charming I was! Oddly, it wasn’t till after I quit drinking that I made this realization.

If you’re an alcoholic, you would be funnier, better company, and surely better looking if you stopped.

That voice inside your head – it’s lying.

 

The benefits of using acamprosate in the treatment of alcoholism

While far from perfect, and only to be used as a part of a more comprehensive drug treatment program, acamprosate or a combination of acamprosate and naltrexone offers some protection against relapse through a reduction in experienced cravings, and a reduction in withdrawal symptoms during the first few months of sobriety.

There are few things as poorly understood as the remarkable complexity of the human brain, and addiction as a function of the brain is only very minimally understood at the neuronal level. Thankfully continuing research initiatives continue to uncover ever increasing pieces of this complicated puzzle, but for now, existing pharmacological interventions for addictions recovery remain imperfect.

Three of the most commonly used medications in the treatment of alcohol addiction, are disulfiram, naltrexone, and the newest medication, acamprosate.

Disulfiram works by making recovering alcoholics very ill if they consume alcohol concurrently with the medication, and naltrexone works by reducing the pleasurable rewards of drinking. Acamprosate works by stabilizing brain activity altered by abuse, and reducing the compulsions to abuse.

Acamprosate has its mechanism of action within the GABA neurotransmitter systems of the brain, and it is this damaged GABA system that results in dangerous tremors or convulsions during acute alcohol withdrawal, and also seems to continue to influence cravings to abuse. Alcohol is a natural GABA inhibitor and acamprosate also inhibits the neurotransmitter, allowing brain activity levels to stabilize naturally and slowly over time, with less experienced discomfort, or cravings back to abuse.

Acamprosate is no magic solution, and a significant percentage of people treated with acamprosate during the initial months of alcohol recovery will relapse back to drinking, but it does work significantly better than nothing, and some research indicates that when the drugs acamprosate and naltrexone are combined, the greatest possible efficacy is achieved.

Acamprosate can reduce some of the anxiety associated with the initial period of abstinence, and also seems to help people sleep better during initial recovery, which is important as insomnia during initial recovery is a significant predictor of relapse and further abuse. Acamprosate also seems to diminish the strength of cravings, at least in the very initial few months of recovery; allowing recovering alcoholics enough time of sobriety to regulate brain activity naturally, and develop natural motivations and strategies to continued relapse avoidance.

Acamprosate also gives addictions professionals another drug in the arsenal against relapse, particularly for alcoholics suffering liver damage, as since it is not significantly metabolized in the liver; it is safe even for cirrhotic patients.

The drug seems to be very well tolerated, and side effects most commonly experienced are headache or nausea. The drug is not intended to be used as a stand alone treatment to alcoholism, but as a part of a comprehensive drug treatment program, including significant psychosocial and behavioral components.

This is a prescription medication, and there some people who cannot take it. As with any prescription drug, you should only take the medication on a doctor’s advice, and under professional care and supervision.

Although acamprosate doesn’t cure alcoholism, it does offer some efficacy during the very tough initial few months of sobriety, and can make those few months just a little more comfortable for people suffering from a legacy of addiction, and resultant brain deficits. The risks of use seem very low when compared with the possible benefits; and when acamprosate is combined therapeutically with naltrexone, it seems to offer significant protection against relapse.

Alcoholism is a serious, stubborn and lasting disease, and while acamprosate certainly won’t cure it; anything that helps to improve the odds of recovery is to my mind a very good thing. If you are struggling with sobriety, speak with your doctor about the risks and benefits of adding acamprosate, or acamprosate and naltrexone, to your medication regimen.

We need to use everything at our disposal to give people the best chance of beating addictions, and living better lives of sobriety.

While far from perfect, and only to be used as a part of a more comprehensive drug treatment program, acamprosate or a combination of acamprosate and naltrexone offers some protection against relapse through a reduction in experienced cravings, and a reduction in withdrawal symptoms during the first few months of sobriety.

There are few things as poorly understood as the remarkable complexity of the human brain, and addiction as a function of the brain is only very minimally understood at the neuronal level. Thankfully continuing research initiatives continue to uncover ever increasing pieces of this complicated puzzle, but for now, existing pharmacological interventions for addictions recovery remain imperfect.

Three of the most commonly used medications in the treatment of alcohol addiction, are disulfiram, naltrexone, and the newest medication, acamprosate.

Disulfiram works by making recovering alcoholics very ill if they consume alcohol concurrently with the medication, and naltrexone works by reducing the pleasurable rewards of drinking. Acamprosate works by stabilizing brain activity altered by abuse, and reducing the compulsions to abuse.

Acamprosate has its mechanism of action within the GABA neurotransmitter systems of the brain, and it is this damaged GABA system that results in dangerous tremors or convulsions during acute alcohol withdrawal, and also seems to continue to influence cravings to abuse. Alcohol is a natural GABA inhibitor and acamprosate also inhibits the neurotransmitter, allowing brain activity levels to stabilize naturally and slowly over time, with less experienced discomfort, or cravings back to abuse.

Acamprosate is no magic solution, and a significant percentage of people treated with acamprosate during the initial months of alcohol recovery will relapse back to drinking, but it does work significantly better than nothing, and some research indicates that when the drugs acamprosate and naltrexone are combined, the greatest possible efficacy is achieved.

Acamprosate can reduce some of the anxiety associated with the initial period of abstinence, and also seems to help people sleep better during initial recovery, which is important as insomnia during initial recovery is a significant predictor of relapse and further abuse. Acamprosate also seems to diminish the strength of cravings, at least in the very initial few months of recovery; allowing recovering alcoholics enough time of sobriety to regulate brain activity naturally, and develop natural motivations and strategies to continued relapse avoidance.

Acamprosate also gives addictions professionals another drug in the arsenal against relapse, particularly for alcoholics suffering liver damage, as since it is not significantly metabolized in the liver; it is safe even for cirrhotic patients.

The drug seems to be very well tolerated, and side effects most commonly experienced are headache or nausea. The drug is not intended to be used as a stand alone treatment to alcoholism, but as a part of a comprehensive drug treatment program, including significant psychosocial and behavioral components.

This is a prescription medication, and there some people who cannot take it. As with any prescription drug, you should only take the medication on a doctor’s advice, and under professional care and supervision.

Although acamprosate doesn’t cure alcoholism, it does offer some efficacy during the very tough initial few months of sobriety, and can make those few months just a little more comfortable for people suffering from a legacy of addiction, and resultant brain deficits. The risks of use seem very low when compared with the possible benefits; and when acamprosate is combined therapeutically with naltrexone, it seems to offer significant protection against relapse.

Alcoholism is a serious, stubborn and lasting disease, and while acamprosate certainly won’t cure it; anything that helps to improve the odds of recovery is to my mind a very good thing. If you are struggling with sobriety, speak with your doctor about the risks and benefits of adding acamprosate, or acamprosate and naltrexone, to your medication regimen.

We need to use everything at our disposal to give people the best chance of beating addictions, and living better lives of sobriety.

The specific dangers of alcohol abuse for women. Alcohol hurts women more.

Women are at a greater risk to develop addictions, to succumb to acute alcohol poisoning, and to develop a host of physical and mental deficits. Women are more likely to die from cirrhosis, and more likely to get certain cancers and more likely to experience alcohol induced cardiac disease. All people abusing alcohol need treatment help, but women abusers seem especially needy of timely intervention and treatment.

Greater Dangers – Both Acute and Chronic

It’s well known that because of a reduced body weight and a reduced volume of water in the body to dilute the concentration of alcohol, women get drunk quicker than men, and are more at risk for the acute effects of binge drinking, including the risk of fatal overdose; but the dangers to women drinkers a not only acute in nature, and alcoholic women are at greater risk for a number of health disorders than are alcoholic men.

Heavy drinking women are more susceptible to developing addictions, and they also seem predisposed to start feeling the negative effects of chronic alcohol abuse faster than men.

A greater percentage of alcoholic women than alcoholic men will develop often fatal cirrhosis of the liver, and women are also more at risk for malnutrition, anemia and high blood pressure, particularly during very heavy drinking. Women alcoholics also suffer more cardiac damage than do men with equivalent drinking histories.

Women alcoholics suffer proportionally more brain damage and memory loss as a result of drinking behaviors as well, and a recent study comparing men and women with similar histories and durations of use saw women exhibit 11% more "brain shrinkage" (a sign of brain cell death) than men.

Heavy drinking greatly increases the gastro intestinal cancer risk in both men and women, but alcoholic women also suffer a hugely elevated risk for breast cancer; and Women who drink heavily are almost 50% more likely to get breast cancer.

The likelihood of developing alcohol related problems increases later in life, and more women develop drinking problems in late adulthood than do men, at a time when they are a greatest risk to suffer the consequences of their dependency.

Alcohol is physically devastating to all, but women are unfairly susceptible to some of its most dangerous effects; and any woman struggling with alcohol use and dependency needs to consider professional treatment help to lessen the risks of a great many serious and possibly fatal disorders.

Our sisters our mothers and our friends need and deserve intervention and treatment, and because each continuing day of abuse increases the risks of so many serious or even lethal disorders, intervention needs to occur as soon as is possible.

Women are at a greater risk to develop addictions, to succumb to acute alcohol poisoning, and to develop a host of physical and mental deficits. Women are more likely to die from cirrhosis, and more likely to get certain cancers and more likely to experience alcohol induced cardiac disease. All people abusing alcohol need treatment help, but women abusers seem especially needy of timely intervention and treatment.

Greater Dangers – Both Acute and Chronic

It’s well known that because of a reduced body weight and a reduced volume of water in the body to dilute the concentration of alcohol, women get drunk quicker than men, and are more at risk for the acute effects of binge drinking, including the risk of fatal overdose; but the dangers to women drinkers a not only acute in nature, and alcoholic women are at greater risk for a number of health disorders than are alcoholic men.

Heavy drinking women are more susceptible to developing addictions, and they also seem predisposed to start feeling the negative effects of chronic alcohol abuse faster than men.

A greater percentage of alcoholic women than alcoholic men will develop often fatal cirrhosis of the liver, and women are also more at risk for malnutrition, anemia and high blood pressure, particularly during very heavy drinking. Women alcoholics also suffer more cardiac damage than do men with equivalent drinking histories.

Women alcoholics suffer proportionally more brain damage and memory loss as a result of drinking behaviors as well, and a recent study comparing men and women with similar histories and durations of use saw women exhibit 11% more "brain shrinkage" (a sign of brain cell death) than men.

Heavy drinking greatly increases the gastro intestinal cancer risk in both men and women, but alcoholic women also suffer a hugely elevated risk for breast cancer; and Women who drink heavily are almost 50% more likely to get breast cancer.

The likelihood of developing alcohol related problems increases later in life, and more women develop drinking problems in late adulthood than do men, at a time when they are a greatest risk to suffer the consequences of their dependency.

Alcohol is physically devastating to all, but women are unfairly susceptible to some of its most dangerous effects; and any woman struggling with alcohol use and dependency needs to consider professional treatment help to lessen the risks of a great many serious and possibly fatal disorders.

Our sisters our mothers and our friends need and deserve intervention and treatment, and because each continuing day of abuse increases the risks of so many serious or even lethal disorders, intervention needs to occur as soon as is possible.

Inaction is Enabling. Why Doing Nothing Doesn’t Help.

Curtailing enabling behaviors does not require complete inaction on our part.

We often confuse doing anything for enabling, while what enabling covers are only those actions of ours that make it easier for an alcoholic or addict to continue using.

  • We do not enable when we take steps towards getting someone into treatment.
  • Running an intervention is not enabling, it is a proactive and positive step towards a solution.

We are told that the alcoholic needs to come to terms with their own addiction, needs to decide for themselves when and where to turn for help.

Baloney!

Waiting for an addict to decide for themselves to get help is nothing more than inactive enabling. The addict wants to be left alone to drink or drug, they want nothing more than that! Which would be fine, of course, if that was their decision alone, if we didn’t care for them, and if their actions did not have profound and negative implications for our own quality of life.

But we do love them, we live with them, and when they abuse drugs or alcohol, even if they consider it a matter of personal choice, they harm those that must live with them in deep and sometimes lasting ways. Does an alcoholic have the right to subject children in a household to drunkenness, poor role modeling, drunk driving, abuse etc.? Does their personal decision to drink affect them alone?

Family has a right to get involved, inaction is enabling.

Curtailing enabling behaviors does not require complete inaction on our part.

We often confuse doing anything for enabling, while what enabling covers are only those actions of ours that make it easier for an alcoholic or addict to continue using.

  • We do not enable when we take steps towards getting someone into treatment.
  • Running an intervention is not enabling, it is a proactive and positive step towards a solution.

We are told that the alcoholic needs to come to terms with their own addiction, needs to decide for themselves when and where to turn for help.

Baloney!

Waiting for an addict to decide for themselves to get help is nothing more than inactive enabling. The addict wants to be left alone to drink or drug, they want nothing more than that! Which would be fine, of course, if that was their decision alone, if we didn’t care for them, and if their actions did not have profound and negative implications for our own quality of life.

But we do love them, we live with them, and when they abuse drugs or alcohol, even if they consider it a matter of personal choice, they harm those that must live with them in deep and sometimes lasting ways. Does an alcoholic have the right to subject children in a household to drunkenness, poor role modeling, drunk driving, abuse etc.? Does their personal decision to drink affect them alone?

Family has a right to get involved, inaction is enabling.