Can Heavy Drinking Turn You Gay?

A lot of people do things they wouldn’t ordinarily do while drunk – and more than a few marriages have ended over the indiscretions of a drunken spouse. There is something magically horrible in alcohol, which makes us feel increased sexual desire, while losing the ordinary good sense to just go home at the end of the night.

But if you’re wondering why alcohol makes you so weak – take some solace from the humble fruit fly – alcohol intoxication can actually turn him gay.

It’s true, researchers have known that acute alcohol intoxication decreases sexual inhibition in fruit flies, but it turns out that when given repeated doses of alcohol, over a matter of days (designed to replicate the experience of alcohol abuse or alcoholism) male fruit flies, who are normally quite macho, will seek out other males for copulation.

The researchers say that fruit flies are a fairly accurate model for the neurobiological effects of alcohol on mammals, like humans, and research using them can help to explain human alcohol affected sexual behavior.

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A lot of people do things they wouldn’t ordinarily do while drunk – and more than a few marriages have ended over the indiscretions of a drunken spouse. There is something magically horrible in alcohol, which makes us feel increased sexual desire, while losing the ordinary good sense to just go home at the end of the night.

But if you’re wondering why alcohol makes you so weak – take some solace from the humble fruit fly – alcohol intoxication can actually turn him gay.

It’s true, researchers have known that acute alcohol intoxication decreases sexual inhibition in fruit flies, but it turns out that when given repeated doses of alcohol, over a matter of days (designed to replicate the experience of alcohol abuse or alcoholism) male fruit flies, who are normally quite macho, will seek out other males for copulation.

The researchers say that fruit flies are a fairly accurate model for the neurobiological effects of alcohol on mammals, like humans, and research using them can help to explain human alcohol affected sexual behavior.

175 000 Americans avoid alcohol treatment each year because of the stigma of recovery

We as a society are really doing a terrible job helping people overcome alcohol abuse or alcoholism.

Recognized as a disease by the AMA, treatment coverage remains severely limited by most insurance providers, and the high costs of treatment deter hundreds of thousands of people a year, wanting treatment, but unable or unwilling to foot the bill. Even more disturbingly, an incredible number of people who recognize the need for treatment, and who are not unwilling to seek out and even pay for treatment, cite the fear of social repercussions and stigma as a major factor deterring them from initiating treatment.

Here is the breakdown

  • 18.6 million Americans have an alcohol abuse problem or dependency
  • A mere 8% of these people gets treatment each year
  • 4.5% of these people recognize a need for treatment, but for a number of reasons don’t get it…and of these 4.5% (which works out to well over 700 000 people)

24% say a major reason why they don’t get treatment is the fear of social stigma.

So about 175 000 Americans, who recognize that they have a problem and want help don’t get it out of a fear of social or professional repercussions. They would rather continue to be alcoholics, than get better and become labeled as recovering alcoholics…which is a dismal appraisal by hundreds of thousands on the true mood of tolerance within our country. No one would ever avoid chemotherapy for fear of being labeled a cancer survivor!!!

Although alcoholism is recognized as a disease, we continue to treat people afflicted with the condition as social pariahs, who could choose not to drink, but through a lack of willpower, loose morals or sheer self indulgence, just won’t stop drinking. That anyone would choose the heartbreak, ravaged health, and family pain of alcoholism belies belief, but through extension of popular logic, alcoholics must therefore choose these accompanying destructions.

And I wish I could say that those alcoholics that make the decision to avoid treatment out of fear of social repercussions are crazy or paranoid…but I don’t believe that, and although I don’t believe that any price is worthy of the continuing destruction of active alcoholism, there most undoubtedly is a stigma attached to alcohol recovery, and people will pay a social cost for getting treatment.

Never overt, the subtle repercussions’ endure for years after successful abstinence. Whether it’s being continually passed over for deserved promotion, never being invited to coach little league or enduring the chilly civility of neighbors, the costs are not imagined. As a recovering alcoholic, and someone who has participated in treatment and has always been open about my disease; I have felt the discrimination of the ignorant and the uninformed. I never regret having sought treatment, but neither am I naïve any longer about the true attitudes of too many in our country.

Alcoholism is a disease!!!

We need people to understand this, and understand that by continuing this subtle discrimination of recovering alcoholics they propagate the condition. Alcoholism inflicts a heavy price on society and all of us are affected, and by perpetuating myths and stereotypes we all make the problem worse. We contribute to more DUIs, more family abuse and more early deaths. Any time anyone discriminates against or belittles a recovering alcoholic or the disease in general, there may be a still drinking alcoholic within earshot, realizing the price they’ll pay for conceding to treatment. Out of compassion, and out of self interest, all in this country should make it clear through our actions and our words, that we do accept alcoholism as a disease, and that we respect those that can beat it.

We as a society are really doing a terrible job helping people overcome alcohol abuse or alcoholism.

Recognized as a disease by the AMA, treatment coverage remains severely limited by most insurance providers, and the high costs of treatment deter hundreds of thousands of people a year, wanting treatment, but unable or unwilling to foot the bill. Even more disturbingly, an incredible number of people who recognize the need for treatment, and who are not unwilling to seek out and even pay for treatment, cite the fear of social repercussions and stigma as a major factor deterring them from initiating treatment.

Here is the breakdown

  • 18.6 million Americans have an alcohol abuse problem or dependency
  • A mere 8% of these people gets treatment each year
  • 4.5% of these people recognize a need for treatment, but for a number of reasons don’t get it…and of these 4.5% (which works out to well over 700 000 people)

24% say a major reason why they don’t get treatment is the fear of social stigma.

So about 175 000 Americans, who recognize that they have a problem and want help don’t get it out of a fear of social or professional repercussions. They would rather continue to be alcoholics, than get better and become labeled as recovering alcoholics…which is a dismal appraisal by hundreds of thousands on the true mood of tolerance within our country. No one would ever avoid chemotherapy for fear of being labeled a cancer survivor!!!

Although alcoholism is recognized as a disease, we continue to treat people afflicted with the condition as social pariahs, who could choose not to drink, but through a lack of willpower, loose morals or sheer self indulgence, just won’t stop drinking. That anyone would choose the heartbreak, ravaged health, and family pain of alcoholism belies belief, but through extension of popular logic, alcoholics must therefore choose these accompanying destructions.

And I wish I could say that those alcoholics that make the decision to avoid treatment out of fear of social repercussions are crazy or paranoid…but I don’t believe that, and although I don’t believe that any price is worthy of the continuing destruction of active alcoholism, there most undoubtedly is a stigma attached to alcohol recovery, and people will pay a social cost for getting treatment.

Never overt, the subtle repercussions’ endure for years after successful abstinence. Whether it’s being continually passed over for deserved promotion, never being invited to coach little league or enduring the chilly civility of neighbors, the costs are not imagined. As a recovering alcoholic, and someone who has participated in treatment and has always been open about my disease; I have felt the discrimination of the ignorant and the uninformed. I never regret having sought treatment, but neither am I naïve any longer about the true attitudes of too many in our country.

Alcoholism is a disease!!!

We need people to understand this, and understand that by continuing this subtle discrimination of recovering alcoholics they propagate the condition. Alcoholism inflicts a heavy price on society and all of us are affected, and by perpetuating myths and stereotypes we all make the problem worse. We contribute to more DUIs, more family abuse and more early deaths. Any time anyone discriminates against or belittles a recovering alcoholic or the disease in general, there may be a still drinking alcoholic within earshot, realizing the price they’ll pay for conceding to treatment. Out of compassion, and out of self interest, all in this country should make it clear through our actions and our words, that we do accept alcoholism as a disease, and that we respect those that can beat it.

Alcoholics are at great risk to develop osteoporosis later in life. Strategies for better bone health

Alcoholics fall over a lot…and have weakened bones; not an ideal combination.

It seems as though you can pretty much name any part of your body…and alcohol abuse will negatively affect it. Bones are no exception, and the chronic and heavy use and abuse of alcohol is a major contributor to experienced osteoporosis. Osteoporosis has no effective treatment, and prevention is the only way to minimize the odds of this debilitating health and mobility condition.

Alcohol abuse negatively effects bone density and bone health, and it does so in a number of ways.

The problems…

Firstly, alcoholics often neglect their diet and tend to get much of their daily caloric intake through the liquid but empty calories of alcohol. This legacy of nutritional deficits causes many problems, and one expression of nutritional neglect is observed through bones weakened by years of little calcium and vitamin D consumption.

Secondly, chronic alcohol consumption causes an increase in levels of parathyroid hormone, which lessens calcium storage; and alcohol also disrupts the body’s ability to produce calcium linked vitamin D.

Additionally, in both men and women, chronic and heavy alcohol abuse alters bodily hormones that impact on bone health and development. Heavy drinking in men causes a reduction in testosterone, and this decrease in testosterone further decreases peripheral cells called osteoblasts, which are responsible for bone cell formation. Chronic and heavy drinking in women can cause menstrual irregularities and hormonal deficits, and is also linked to a reduction in bone cell development.

The solutions…

Firstly, the best way to reverse the deficits on the skeletal bones of the body is simply through achieving abstinence and ending the continuing assault on calcium.

Secondly, abstinence should be combined with a nutritional program designed to reverse the nutritional deficits created through abuse, and recovering alcoholics should take special care to take additional supplements of vitamin D and of Calcium.

Weight bearing exercise can strengthen bones, and so can quitting smoking.

Many years of alcohol abuse can greatly increase the probability of experiencing osteoporosis in later years. The best way to better the odds and improve bone health is through a better lifestyle and a cessation of drinking.

Don’t worry; you can still drink…milk!

Alcoholics fall over a lot…and have weakened bones; not an ideal combination.

It seems as though you can pretty much name any part of your body…and alcohol abuse will negatively affect it. Bones are no exception, and the chronic and heavy use and abuse of alcohol is a major contributor to experienced osteoporosis. Osteoporosis has no effective treatment, and prevention is the only way to minimize the odds of this debilitating health and mobility condition.

Alcohol abuse negatively effects bone density and bone health, and it does so in a number of ways.

The problems…

Firstly, alcoholics often neglect their diet and tend to get much of their daily caloric intake through the liquid but empty calories of alcohol. This legacy of nutritional deficits causes many problems, and one expression of nutritional neglect is observed through bones weakened by years of little calcium and vitamin D consumption.

Secondly, chronic alcohol consumption causes an increase in levels of parathyroid hormone, which lessens calcium storage; and alcohol also disrupts the body’s ability to produce calcium linked vitamin D.

Additionally, in both men and women, chronic and heavy alcohol abuse alters bodily hormones that impact on bone health and development. Heavy drinking in men causes a reduction in testosterone, and this decrease in testosterone further decreases peripheral cells called osteoblasts, which are responsible for bone cell formation. Chronic and heavy drinking in women can cause menstrual irregularities and hormonal deficits, and is also linked to a reduction in bone cell development.

The solutions…

Firstly, the best way to reverse the deficits on the skeletal bones of the body is simply through achieving abstinence and ending the continuing assault on calcium.

Secondly, abstinence should be combined with a nutritional program designed to reverse the nutritional deficits created through abuse, and recovering alcoholics should take special care to take additional supplements of vitamin D and of Calcium.

Weight bearing exercise can strengthen bones, and so can quitting smoking.

Many years of alcohol abuse can greatly increase the probability of experiencing osteoporosis in later years. The best way to better the odds and improve bone health is through a better lifestyle and a cessation of drinking.

Don’t worry; you can still drink…milk!