Should parents be drug testing their kids?

Cheap, reliable and accurate – drug tests give you peace of mind, and also let you get them the help needed quickly, should a test come back positive.

There is nothing an adolescent hates more than an intrusion into their privacy, and drug tests are certainly intrusive, but they are also very accurate, and can be a very useful tool for parents concerned about substance use and abuse. I don’t think that drug testing is necessarily appropriate as a preventative measure for kids without a history of abuse, and if they have acted responsibly they should be rewarded for that behavior with increasing levels of trust; but for kids with a history of abuse, I feel that they are a valid parental tool.

About half of all kids who enter a residential treatment program will relapse back to some degree of drug or alcohol abuse at some point, and the earlier this use is detected, the earlier help can be arranged and the greater ultimate probability of success. Kids who have a history of drug and alcohol abuse should be informed that drug testing is to become a regular part of the family life, and there should be no exceptions made once this announcement is made.

Today’s testing kits, particularly urine testing kits, are inexpensive, very reliable and accurate; and provide an easy way for parents to be sure of their kid’s use or non use. The fact is that all kids will lie to their parents at some point, and kids with drug or alcohol abuse problems are even more prone to lying to cover their abusive behaviors; but a drug test does not lie, and teens will also know in advance that if they use, their parents will know. The ideal result for the introduction of family drug testing is not to catch teens in the act as such, but to keep them from indulging, knowing that if they do they will certainly be caught.

The consequences for a positive test result should be made clear in advance, and if a test does come back positive, parents must have the strength to implement whatever treatment or consequences had been pre agreed to. If a kid knows that a positive drug test means another session at a drug rehab facility, that may be enough to keep them from using. Kids are pretty clever though, so you have to be sure that the test you are using is reliable, and as well be aware of any possible ways to "fool" the test.

Kids get the information they need to beat drug tests from the internet, but that info is there for you too. Speak with an addictions specialist on the best way to implement reliable and accurate drug testing into your family’s routine. Your kids will hate it, but it might just be enough of a deterrent to use that it will keep them safe…and they’ll thank you for it later. Parenting an adolescent is never easy, and when your teen is using or abusing drugs or alcohol, this transitional period is especially complex. Drug testing can help.

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Cheap, reliable and accurate – drug tests give you peace of mind, and also let you get them the help needed quickly, should a test come back positive.

There is nothing an adolescent hates more than an intrusion into their privacy, and drug tests are certainly intrusive, but they are also very accurate, and can be a very useful tool for parents concerned about substance use and abuse. I don’t think that drug testing is necessarily appropriate as a preventative measure for kids without a history of abuse, and if they have acted responsibly they should be rewarded for that behavior with increasing levels of trust; but for kids with a history of abuse, I feel that they are a valid parental tool.

About half of all kids who enter a residential treatment program will relapse back to some degree of drug or alcohol abuse at some point, and the earlier this use is detected, the earlier help can be arranged and the greater ultimate probability of success. Kids who have a history of drug and alcohol abuse should be informed that drug testing is to become a regular part of the family life, and there should be no exceptions made once this announcement is made.

Today’s testing kits, particularly urine testing kits, are inexpensive, very reliable and accurate; and provide an easy way for parents to be sure of their kid’s use or non use. The fact is that all kids will lie to their parents at some point, and kids with drug or alcohol abuse problems are even more prone to lying to cover their abusive behaviors; but a drug test does not lie, and teens will also know in advance that if they use, their parents will know. The ideal result for the introduction of family drug testing is not to catch teens in the act as such, but to keep them from indulging, knowing that if they do they will certainly be caught.

The consequences for a positive test result should be made clear in advance, and if a test does come back positive, parents must have the strength to implement whatever treatment or consequences had been pre agreed to. If a kid knows that a positive drug test means another session at a drug rehab facility, that may be enough to keep them from using. Kids are pretty clever though, so you have to be sure that the test you are using is reliable, and as well be aware of any possible ways to "fool" the test.

Kids get the information they need to beat drug tests from the internet, but that info is there for you too. Speak with an addictions specialist on the best way to implement reliable and accurate drug testing into your family’s routine. Your kids will hate it, but it might just be enough of a deterrent to use that it will keep them safe…and they’ll thank you for it later. Parenting an adolescent is never easy, and when your teen is using or abusing drugs or alcohol, this transitional period is especially complex. Drug testing can help.

Dextromethorphan, the Monster in the Medicine Cabinet. DXM Is Scary Stuff.

How can parents protect their kids from drugs, when the drugs are available for sale at the local pharmacy?

Firstly, I’m going to preface this posting with an apology, I don’t know how to protect my kids from this new threat. I’ve talked about the dangers of drugs until I’ve grown hoarse, and they’ve grown bored, and they are some pretty well educated kids on the dangers and realities of drug abuse. But when the FDA reports that 2.4 million American teens have used dextromethorphan (the active ingredient in a number of cough and cold medication) I’m not to sure how much effect my words can have; I mean surely at least some of those parents had warned their kids about the dangers of drugs too!?!

Photo: Editor BDextromethorphan (DXM) when taken in large quantities can cause euphoria, slight hallucinations, slurred speech and uncoordination, and when taken in very large quantities can cause out of body experiences like with ketamine or PCP; and in a new and disturbing trend, street dealers have started selling pure DXM in capsule form.

A quick browse on the web should be enough to scare parents, and all the information needed on how to use DXM, how to extract it, which brands to buy, the dosage by body weight…everything is there. If only kids worked as hard in biology as they do at self pharmacology!

The FDA reports that at least 5 kids have died from overdose, it can cause brain damage, seizures and heart arrhythmia, and the really scary part is that nobody really knows what the long term consequences of this drug will be. Kids are taking it and they’re taking a lot of it, and it’s probably going to do them a lot of harm. Common parental guidelines suggest watching the medicine cabinet, and watching for intoxicated behavior, but how much does this really do? The amount needed to get high is more than most people stock in their medicine cabinet, and kids are pretty good about hiding things when they want to?

I guess it just comes down to being involved in your kid’s lives, to watching for the warning signs, being ready to help, and hoping for the best. Good luck to parents everywhere, and this is just one more thing to add to that long list of worries.

How can parents protect their kids from drugs, when the drugs are available for sale at the local pharmacy?

Firstly, I’m going to preface this posting with an apology, I don’t know how to protect my kids from this new threat. I’ve talked about the dangers of drugs until I’ve grown hoarse, and they’ve grown bored, and they are some pretty well educated kids on the dangers and realities of drug abuse. But when the FDA reports that 2.4 million American teens have used dextromethorphan (the active ingredient in a number of cough and cold medication) I’m not to sure how much effect my words can have; I mean surely at least some of those parents had warned their kids about the dangers of drugs too!?!

Photo: Editor BDextromethorphan (DXM) when taken in large quantities can cause euphoria, slight hallucinations, slurred speech and uncoordination, and when taken in very large quantities can cause out of body experiences like with ketamine or PCP; and in a new and disturbing trend, street dealers have started selling pure DXM in capsule form.

A quick browse on the web should be enough to scare parents, and all the information needed on how to use DXM, how to extract it, which brands to buy, the dosage by body weight…everything is there. If only kids worked as hard in biology as they do at self pharmacology!

The FDA reports that at least 5 kids have died from overdose, it can cause brain damage, seizures and heart arrhythmia, and the really scary part is that nobody really knows what the long term consequences of this drug will be. Kids are taking it and they’re taking a lot of it, and it’s probably going to do them a lot of harm. Common parental guidelines suggest watching the medicine cabinet, and watching for intoxicated behavior, but how much does this really do? The amount needed to get high is more than most people stock in their medicine cabinet, and kids are pretty good about hiding things when they want to?

I guess it just comes down to being involved in your kid’s lives, to watching for the warning signs, being ready to help, and hoping for the best. Good luck to parents everywhere, and this is just one more thing to add to that long list of worries.

Kids and Drugs…Don’t Ignore the Signs of Abuse

Photo: Jaypeg21Finding out my 14 year old niece had been experimenting with drugs was shocking, and although she has sworn she won’t use again…how can we as parents know that our kids are safe from drugs?

Her Rights to Privacy?

I’ve decided that her privacy rights are less important than ensuring that she is drug free, and although it’s never fun or pleasant to invade someone’s personal space, if that’s what it takes to keep her safe, then that’s what I’ll do.

The years of adolescence are a period of transition and often a period of experimentation; and this is of course simply the normal progression and maturation into adulthood. But this willingness to experiment, coupled with a perception of immortality, makes the likelihood of trying and potentially abusing drugs very high.

Most kids don’t do drugs, a lot do but never have a problem, and a small percentage of kids will sadly suffer the devastation of addiction, at a time of life that can be tough enough as it is. You want to be there for your kids, but as they age and separate in their quest for autonomy, it can be increasingly tough to feel confident that you really know your kids, and more importantly, know what they’re up to. All you can do as parents is to educate your kids about the dangers and keep on the lookout for any of the warning signs that may point to drug abuse; and should anything indicate drug use, be ready to take the steps necessary to protect your kids. You want to trust you kids and give them the personal space they crave, but if you’re concerned about drug use, it’s better to have them seething as you search their room, then possibly let them continue on the road to destruction.

As a recovering drug and alcohol addict, I’ve always been confident that I’d know of any drug or alcohol use pretty quickly

I know how addicts behave, and I’m far too familiar with the effects of most drugs – but I guess I wasn’t as perceptive as I thought. My 14 year old niece (I’m her legal guardian) recently jumped out of the car after school only to have a bottle of Visine tumble out of her pocket onto the seat.

We both saw it, and although she tried to act nonchalant, I know that normal kids have no need for eye drops, and remember all to well hastily fixing my own eyes before walking past my parents when I was a kid. After a long and serious talk, she eventually confessed to using marijuana with her friends, and although adamant that it was no big deal, has agreed to stop using.

I know that this doesn’t necessarily mean that she will, but at least I now know she’s vulnerable to drugs and abuse, and I am going to be watching her pretty carefully for the next few years. Now if she hadn’t confessed to her usage, this would have left me in a very uncomfortable position. I don’t believe that she has a need for Visine other than to hide the symptoms of drug use, but I have no other solid evidence to confirm my suspicions. At this point, you can either accept them at their word, or invade their privacy to get concrete evidence one way or the other.

Not an easy or fun decision; but I know how destructive drug use can become, and as such I know what I would have done.

I thought I was safe

She’s a good student, and doesn’t display any of the normal and stereotypical behaviors of drug use, and so I thought she was in the clear. Everyone needs to talk to their kids about drugs, but just as importantly, don’t assume that simply because your child looks and acts the same, that they are not using drugs.

Anyone can fall victim to drug abuse, and sometimes behavioral changes, failing grades, and failing health don’t appear until the abuse has already become severe. It is far better to discover drug abuse in the early stages, and so parents must be vigilant and observant for any indications of use. With cheap drugs like meth and school-yard heroin now available, it wouldn’t take much experimentation to destroy a life full of promise, and although education helps, it’s not always enough.

Be there for your kids, and be aware of the signs and symptoms that may indicate drug use. Teens value privacy, but you’ve got to keep them safe, and if you need to invade their personal space to ensure they’re drug free, then maybe it needs to be done.

Photo: Jaypeg21Finding out my 14 year old niece had been experimenting with drugs was shocking, and although she has sworn she won’t use again…how can we as parents know that our kids are safe from drugs?

Her Rights to Privacy?

I’ve decided that her privacy rights are less important than ensuring that she is drug free, and although it’s never fun or pleasant to invade someone’s personal space, if that’s what it takes to keep her safe, then that’s what I’ll do.

The years of adolescence are a period of transition and often a period of experimentation; and this is of course simply the normal progression and maturation into adulthood. But this willingness to experiment, coupled with a perception of immortality, makes the likelihood of trying and potentially abusing drugs very high.

Most kids don’t do drugs, a lot do but never have a problem, and a small percentage of kids will sadly suffer the devastation of addiction, at a time of life that can be tough enough as it is. You want to be there for your kids, but as they age and separate in their quest for autonomy, it can be increasingly tough to feel confident that you really know your kids, and more importantly, know what they’re up to. All you can do as parents is to educate your kids about the dangers and keep on the lookout for any of the warning signs that may point to drug abuse; and should anything indicate drug use, be ready to take the steps necessary to protect your kids. You want to trust you kids and give them the personal space they crave, but if you’re concerned about drug use, it’s better to have them seething as you search their room, then possibly let them continue on the road to destruction.

As a recovering drug and alcohol addict, I’ve always been confident that I’d know of any drug or alcohol use pretty quickly

I know how addicts behave, and I’m far too familiar with the effects of most drugs – but I guess I wasn’t as perceptive as I thought. My 14 year old niece (I’m her legal guardian) recently jumped out of the car after school only to have a bottle of Visine tumble out of her pocket onto the seat.

We both saw it, and although she tried to act nonchalant, I know that normal kids have no need for eye drops, and remember all to well hastily fixing my own eyes before walking past my parents when I was a kid. After a long and serious talk, she eventually confessed to using marijuana with her friends, and although adamant that it was no big deal, has agreed to stop using.

I know that this doesn’t necessarily mean that she will, but at least I now know she’s vulnerable to drugs and abuse, and I am going to be watching her pretty carefully for the next few years. Now if she hadn’t confessed to her usage, this would have left me in a very uncomfortable position. I don’t believe that she has a need for Visine other than to hide the symptoms of drug use, but I have no other solid evidence to confirm my suspicions. At this point, you can either accept them at their word, or invade their privacy to get concrete evidence one way or the other.

Not an easy or fun decision; but I know how destructive drug use can become, and as such I know what I would have done.

I thought I was safe

She’s a good student, and doesn’t display any of the normal and stereotypical behaviors of drug use, and so I thought she was in the clear. Everyone needs to talk to their kids about drugs, but just as importantly, don’t assume that simply because your child looks and acts the same, that they are not using drugs.

Anyone can fall victim to drug abuse, and sometimes behavioral changes, failing grades, and failing health don’t appear until the abuse has already become severe. It is far better to discover drug abuse in the early stages, and so parents must be vigilant and observant for any indications of use. With cheap drugs like meth and school-yard heroin now available, it wouldn’t take much experimentation to destroy a life full of promise, and although education helps, it’s not always enough.

Be there for your kids, and be aware of the signs and symptoms that may indicate drug use. Teens value privacy, but you’ve got to keep them safe, and if you need to invade their personal space to ensure they’re drug free, then maybe it needs to be done.