Is the Salvation Army Rehab Right for You?

Anyone, rich or poor, can get addiction treatment at the Salvation Army. They do good work and Good Works, and they don’t get the recognition they deserve.

Here’s a testimonial video of a woman describing how the Salvation Army helped her get her life and her Faith back on track.

As a Faith based organization, they aren’t a perfect fit for everyone, but for a lot of us out there who sometimes need a little help, they are always there.

If you need help, remember that with places like the Salvation Army running treatment programs across the country, a lack of funds is no excuse to keep on using.

It’s a nice story of a woman who got the help she needed and made it through.

Anyone, rich or poor, can get addiction treatment at the Salvation Army. They do good work and Good Works, and they don’t get the recognition they deserve.

Here’s a testimonial video of a woman describing how the Salvation Army helped her get her life and her Faith back on track.

As a Faith based organization, they aren’t a perfect fit for everyone, but for a lot of us out there who sometimes need a little help, they are always there.

If you need help, remember that with places like the Salvation Army running treatment programs across the country, a lack of funds is no excuse to keep on using.

It’s a nice story of a woman who got the help she needed and made it through.

Commit a Crime – Win Free Drug Treatment!

Yay Drug Courts! It’s hard to find anyone these days with much of anything bad to say about drug courts. These alternative sentencing vehicles are saving tax payers a huge amount of money, they are freeing up space in overcrowded jails, they are helping people in need beat terrible addictions, reuniting families and the recidivism rates for drug court graduates are far lower than for offenders processed through the traditional court system. Yay! Seriously, they work, and they save everyone money, and it’s great news that drug courts are now in operation in all 50 states, with a total of 2000 in operation or in the works. But They have created a rather strange set of circumstances.

  • If you are poor, addicted to drugs and alcohol and really want some help to get better – but are not a criminal – you are out of luck.
  • If you are poor, addicted to drugs or alcohol, don’t care if you get help or not, and commit crimes – then you get free drug treatment.

It’s an absurdity, and I have spoken with a few people over the last months who find themselves in this frustrating predicament. It seems to them, that the only way they are going to be able to get drug treatment, is by being arrested for a crime. Not ideal Drug courts aren’t going away, nor should they. They work better than the traditional court system, they are more humane and they treat the root cause of such a lot of the criminal behavior in this country today. But why should we wait to provide funding for people only after they commit crimes? Why not give them a leg up before it gets to that stage? Let’s keep the drug courts, but expand the programming so that anyone in need can have access to the same sorts of treatment programs. Maybe that will cut down on the eventual need for courts and drug courts alike, while saving a great deal of tax-payer money on everything from law-enforcement to welfare to health care. Besides, it’s the right thing to do – and it’s only fair.

Yay Drug Courts! It’s hard to find anyone these days with much of anything bad to say about drug courts. These alternative sentencing vehicles are saving tax payers a huge amount of money, they are freeing up space in overcrowded jails, they are helping people in need beat terrible addictions, reuniting families and the recidivism rates for drug court graduates are far lower than for offenders processed through the traditional court system. Yay! Seriously, they work, and they save everyone money, and it’s great news that drug courts are now in operation in all 50 states, with a total of 2000 in operation or in the works. But They have created a rather strange set of circumstances.

  • If you are poor, addicted to drugs and alcohol and really want some help to get better – but are not a criminal – you are out of luck.
  • If you are poor, addicted to drugs or alcohol, don’t care if you get help or not, and commit crimes – then you get free drug treatment.

It’s an absurdity, and I have spoken with a few people over the last months who find themselves in this frustrating predicament. It seems to them, that the only way they are going to be able to get drug treatment, is by being arrested for a crime. Not ideal Drug courts aren’t going away, nor should they. They work better than the traditional court system, they are more humane and they treat the root cause of such a lot of the criminal behavior in this country today. But why should we wait to provide funding for people only after they commit crimes? Why not give them a leg up before it gets to that stage? Let’s keep the drug courts, but expand the programming so that anyone in need can have access to the same sorts of treatment programs. Maybe that will cut down on the eventual need for courts and drug courts alike, while saving a great deal of tax-payer money on everything from law-enforcement to welfare to health care. Besides, it’s the right thing to do – and it’s only fair.

Addiction Recovery…Don’t Do It Alone

We, as humans, are social animals.

From birth we learn from our family; as children, friends take on a bigger role until when in our teens, the collective wisdom of our peers exerts a primal influence. As adults we tend to think it all past us, but in reality our peer environment still influences our actions and perceptions, and the people we choose to associate with tend to have a profound impact on our lives.

And this is why although recovery alone is possible, recovery in a group is far more possible, and for the best likelihood of success recovery should harness the power of the group.

As using addicts or alcoholics, we tend to associate socially with others who share our life-focus for intoxication; it’s a natural byproduct of the disease! We take our social cues from our group of peers, and in a big way what we perceive to be acceptable standards of behaviors are derived from what others around us are also doing.

If I drink 12 beers a day but my friend drinks 24 beers a day, well, I’m a moderate drinker!

Getting into rehab offers a lot. It offers a period of enforced sobriety, which can transform a life on its own. It offers the wisdom and guidance of addictions professionals, and it offers classes in relapse avoidance and life skills that impart the tools we’ll need to succeed. But more, much more than this, it also offers us the inspiration of others also in recovery.

We learn through the process of group recovery that although we are unique as individuals, our problems with drugs and alcohol share an incredible similarity. We also see that if others, who have it just as bad as we do, can recover – then there is no reason why we can’t too. There is a real sense of inspiration that comes from working together towards a common goal with others who share the same troubles; and it can work a real magic on even the most reluctant and hard-headed of addicts.

Rehab is supposed to be a place of transformation, and there is true power in this collective effort of recovery. You might be able to do it alone, but it’s easier and far more likely done in a group setting.

Find a place of healing where you can find your inspiration. Find a group of fellow alcoholics or addicts who understand you as you understand them, and start your journey towards recovery together. It helps.

We, as humans, are social animals.

From birth we learn from our family; as children, friends take on a bigger role until when in our teens, the collective wisdom of our peers exerts a primal influence. As adults we tend to think it all past us, but in reality our peer environment still influences our actions and perceptions, and the people we choose to associate with tend to have a profound impact on our lives.

And this is why although recovery alone is possible, recovery in a group is far more possible, and for the best likelihood of success recovery should harness the power of the group.

As using addicts or alcoholics, we tend to associate socially with others who share our life-focus for intoxication; it’s a natural byproduct of the disease! We take our social cues from our group of peers, and in a big way what we perceive to be acceptable standards of behaviors are derived from what others around us are also doing.

If I drink 12 beers a day but my friend drinks 24 beers a day, well, I’m a moderate drinker!

Getting into rehab offers a lot. It offers a period of enforced sobriety, which can transform a life on its own. It offers the wisdom and guidance of addictions professionals, and it offers classes in relapse avoidance and life skills that impart the tools we’ll need to succeed. But more, much more than this, it also offers us the inspiration of others also in recovery.

We learn through the process of group recovery that although we are unique as individuals, our problems with drugs and alcohol share an incredible similarity. We also see that if others, who have it just as bad as we do, can recover – then there is no reason why we can’t too. There is a real sense of inspiration that comes from working together towards a common goal with others who share the same troubles; and it can work a real magic on even the most reluctant and hard-headed of addicts.

Rehab is supposed to be a place of transformation, and there is true power in this collective effort of recovery. You might be able to do it alone, but it’s easier and far more likely done in a group setting.

Find a place of healing where you can find your inspiration. Find a group of fellow alcoholics or addicts who understand you as you understand them, and start your journey towards recovery together. It helps.

Free Christian Rehabs…Why No One Should Complain About the Work They Do.

Now a lot of people have a bit of a problem with evangelical Christianity. They don’t much care for people who try to convince them out of word views and beliefs they’re perfectly happy with already, and they feel that there is something a bit distasteful in the whole missionary to the world, spreading the light kind of thing.

And I can understand where they’re coming from as well, but when you look at who is and who is not stepping up to help people with addictions in this country, you have to give a lot of credit to Christian good works.

I’ve just spent a week compiling an enormous list of free or almost free rehabs (1300 or more by now, contact me if you need some advice!) and the there are more Christian residential programs offering free of charge care to those in need than all others combined. Some may be effective and some may struggle, but at the core, they strive to do good, strive with limited resources, and strive to include access to all in need…without a thought of monetary reward.

Now there is no doubt that they act out of dual motivations, and intermingled with a desire to do good works is surely a desire to spread the word of Christianity; but they make no apologies for their actions and they never hide their intentions. They are doing what they think is right and what needs doing, and they are saving an awful lot of lives in the process.

Compare them to another "religious" organization, Narconon, which although a front for Scientology, makes no mention of this in any of their aggressive promotional literature, and once they get you into their quasi scientific program of questionable merits, do make efforts to convert you to their world view. To me, this is extremely distasteful.

So if you do resent the motivations and actions of evangelical Christianity and their works to spread the word, that is your right; but remember that they do great good for those in need and with no where else to go; and if you feel strongly enough about it, get involved and give these people some secular alternatives for help.

They do want you to "switch teams" as it were, and in the process of saving lives from the pains of addiction and despair, they probably recruit a few grateful members along the way. But if your philosophy is to deny them the right to do their Christian good works, without somehow providing an equal quality and quantity of secular services to those in need, then you espouse hypocrisy. Addicts and alcoholics enter into free of charge recovery programs willingly and with thanks, and they are never forced to participate. If you’re trying to save them from the pains of conversion, you’re sending back to the pains of addiction…and ask them which fate they’d rather.

All of us should feel some personal obligation to do more good than harm throughout the course of our lives, and there are a great many ways to even out that balance sheet; but those who speak badly about Christian recovery organizations, who would deny them funding and who would like to see them gone do not contribute good, and without providing an acceptable alternative, do harm.

Whether you are Christian or not, see that these people do good works, and if you don’t like it, don’t wish them removed, but give freely to the United Way or to your local secular shelter or rehab, and let them expand their services to more who need it.

Now a lot of people have a bit of a problem with evangelical Christianity. They don’t much care for people who try to convince them out of word views and beliefs they’re perfectly happy with already, and they feel that there is something a bit distasteful in the whole missionary to the world, spreading the light kind of thing.

And I can understand where they’re coming from as well, but when you look at who is and who is not stepping up to help people with addictions in this country, you have to give a lot of credit to Christian good works.

I’ve just spent a week compiling an enormous list of free or almost free rehabs (1300 or more by now, contact me if you need some advice!) and the there are more Christian residential programs offering free of charge care to those in need than all others combined. Some may be effective and some may struggle, but at the core, they strive to do good, strive with limited resources, and strive to include access to all in need…without a thought of monetary reward.

Now there is no doubt that they act out of dual motivations, and intermingled with a desire to do good works is surely a desire to spread the word of Christianity; but they make no apologies for their actions and they never hide their intentions. They are doing what they think is right and what needs doing, and they are saving an awful lot of lives in the process.

Compare them to another "religious" organization, Narconon, which although a front for Scientology, makes no mention of this in any of their aggressive promotional literature, and once they get you into their quasi scientific program of questionable merits, do make efforts to convert you to their world view. To me, this is extremely distasteful.

So if you do resent the motivations and actions of evangelical Christianity and their works to spread the word, that is your right; but remember that they do great good for those in need and with no where else to go; and if you feel strongly enough about it, get involved and give these people some secular alternatives for help.

They do want you to "switch teams" as it were, and in the process of saving lives from the pains of addiction and despair, they probably recruit a few grateful members along the way. But if your philosophy is to deny them the right to do their Christian good works, without somehow providing an equal quality and quantity of secular services to those in need, then you espouse hypocrisy. Addicts and alcoholics enter into free of charge recovery programs willingly and with thanks, and they are never forced to participate. If you’re trying to save them from the pains of conversion, you’re sending back to the pains of addiction…and ask them which fate they’d rather.

All of us should feel some personal obligation to do more good than harm throughout the course of our lives, and there are a great many ways to even out that balance sheet; but those who speak badly about Christian recovery organizations, who would deny them funding and who would like to see them gone do not contribute good, and without providing an acceptable alternative, do harm.

Whether you are Christian or not, see that these people do good works, and if you don’t like it, don’t wish them removed, but give freely to the United Way or to your local secular shelter or rehab, and let them expand their services to more who need it.

Executive rehab… Continuing to work as you work at better health

For recovering addicts like myself, the thought of maintaining access to work colleagues and fulfilling necessary business requirements while sequestered in a rehab facility is perplexing, and a bit concerning as well. A residential drug rehab treatment program should be intensive to the point of the exclusion of anything extraneous but the focus on recovery and sobriety…and contact to the outside world should be as minimal as possible to heighten the focus on an internal recovery.

An executive rehab runs a little bit differently.

Firstly, an executive rehab offers complete confidentiality, and strives through elaborate means to respect the need for secrecy of its sometime powerful and well known alumni. While all rehabs are medical facilities, and are by nature confidential to outside inquiries, an executive rehab will go so far as to never telephone or even mail information to the recovering addict’s residence or workplace without prior consent, to minimize the risk of unwanted discovery of treatment.

The costs of an executive rehab will generally exceed that of a conventional private rehab, and for those additional fees the programming and therapeutic attention as offered are intensive and of the highest quality; all done to speed the process of recovery allowing busy and powerful executives to resume their stations as soon as possible. With high fees also come luxurious accommodations and facilities, and executive rehabs are generally located within peaceful and secluded grounds, both to encourage quiet and meditative contemplation, and also to further minimize the risk of unwanted attention.

Staying Connected

But where an executive rehab truly differs from a conventional rehab is in the amount of contact to the workplace and outside world allowed. The patients at an executive rehab facility will be allowed to maintain necessary work communications with their colleagues, and although professional staff encourage a minimization of work during the treatment period, executives are permitted to work as much as they need to to ensure that their responsibilities are adequately covered.

When you think about this last allowance, it at first seems contrary to the ideals of a residential rehab, and if work continues unabated during treatment, how can there be room left for the needed focus on recovery? But when I consider an executive rehab further, I realize that these programs are designed to remove barriers to entry and obstacles to treatment. No one will initiate needed therapy if the personal and professional costs are too high; and for many executives, the admission of a need for rehab is perceived to be too damaging to a hard earned career. By allowing executives to recover in very private surroundings, with continued communications access to the work place, you allow them to maintain the secrecy of their treatment, and act as if they were only on an extended holiday.

Ideally addicts enter a rehab facility and forget about their outside responsibilities for the time needed to get better, but if by refusing to grant access to work responsibilities you inhibit the ability of certain people to participate in drug or alcohol abuse treatment, then the needed concessions do I think make sense. It’s too bad that these executives feel that an admission of normal human weakness would cost them so much that they are fearful to get the treatment they need; but we can’t ignore reality, and although I can’t see how engaging in anything other than the work of recovery while in a rehab can be helpful, if that’s what’s needed to get these people the help they deserve, then it is a positive step to better health.

For recovering addicts like myself, the thought of maintaining access to work colleagues and fulfilling necessary business requirements while sequestered in a rehab facility is perplexing, and a bit concerning as well. A residential drug rehab treatment program should be intensive to the point of the exclusion of anything extraneous but the focus on recovery and sobriety…and contact to the outside world should be as minimal as possible to heighten the focus on an internal recovery.

An executive rehab runs a little bit differently.

Firstly, an executive rehab offers complete confidentiality, and strives through elaborate means to respect the need for secrecy of its sometime powerful and well known alumni. While all rehabs are medical facilities, and are by nature confidential to outside inquiries, an executive rehab will go so far as to never telephone or even mail information to the recovering addict’s residence or workplace without prior consent, to minimize the risk of unwanted discovery of treatment.

The costs of an executive rehab will generally exceed that of a conventional private rehab, and for those additional fees the programming and therapeutic attention as offered are intensive and of the highest quality; all done to speed the process of recovery allowing busy and powerful executives to resume their stations as soon as possible. With high fees also come luxurious accommodations and facilities, and executive rehabs are generally located within peaceful and secluded grounds, both to encourage quiet and meditative contemplation, and also to further minimize the risk of unwanted attention.

Staying Connected

But where an executive rehab truly differs from a conventional rehab is in the amount of contact to the workplace and outside world allowed. The patients at an executive rehab facility will be allowed to maintain necessary work communications with their colleagues, and although professional staff encourage a minimization of work during the treatment period, executives are permitted to work as much as they need to to ensure that their responsibilities are adequately covered.

When you think about this last allowance, it at first seems contrary to the ideals of a residential rehab, and if work continues unabated during treatment, how can there be room left for the needed focus on recovery? But when I consider an executive rehab further, I realize that these programs are designed to remove barriers to entry and obstacles to treatment. No one will initiate needed therapy if the personal and professional costs are too high; and for many executives, the admission of a need for rehab is perceived to be too damaging to a hard earned career. By allowing executives to recover in very private surroundings, with continued communications access to the work place, you allow them to maintain the secrecy of their treatment, and act as if they were only on an extended holiday.

Ideally addicts enter a rehab facility and forget about their outside responsibilities for the time needed to get better, but if by refusing to grant access to work responsibilities you inhibit the ability of certain people to participate in drug or alcohol abuse treatment, then the needed concessions do I think make sense. It’s too bad that these executives feel that an admission of normal human weakness would cost them so much that they are fearful to get the treatment they need; but we can’t ignore reality, and although I can’t see how engaging in anything other than the work of recovery while in a rehab can be helpful, if that’s what’s needed to get these people the help they deserve, then it is a positive step to better health.

Why we need to use medications in drug rehab… and why we should be suspicious of those rehabs that don’t

The rehab philosophies that call for a complete abstinence from all drugs and medications during recovery are to my thinking ridiculous. There are hundreds of rehab facilities throughout the U.S. that follow a philosophy of either natural alternative treatment or other alternative quasi scientific ideals of recovery; and as a result many thousands of people endure un medicated drug treatment each year.

  • Firstly, the use of certain medications during rehab can make more humane and comfortable an already very difficult transitory period to sobriety…and what possible harm can a couple of ibuprofens do to a person suffering the pains of opiate withdrawal?
  • Secondly, certain withdrawals can induce acute and even chronic conditions that are either dangerous or even life threatening. Until alternative therapies are clinically proven to reduce the incidence of dangerous convulsive episodes during sedative or alcohol withdrawals, I certainly can’t imagine recommending that anyone I loved endure such a risky period of detox.
  • Thirdly, the use of psychiatric medications can be the difference between depression, anxiety and an inability or unwillingness to actively participate in the lessons of rehab; and symptoms reduction and a better ability to integrate all that rehab offers. Why should people suffering a very difficult period of detox and recovery exacerbate their suffering by adhering to any philosophy of recovery that does not allow for non psychotropic medications? Medications that can both decrease discomfort and also improve an ability to participate enthusiastically in drug treatment and therapies.

I’m all for alternative therapies, and since what works for one person may not work for another, by giving people the widest possible range of tools in their arsenal against addiction, I believe you improve the overall ability to resist temptation. Previously suspiciously regarded therapies such as yoga therapy, meditation therapy, or even karate therapy have all proven clinically beneficial and are now increasingly accepted into mainstream treatments. I do not believe that the recovery methods as used today are good enough, and I am grateful for continuing research in this area that offers hope of improvement. But, although our current methods are imperfect, we should not abandon them for something completely unproven and even medically dangerous; essentially experimental therapy using human guinea pigs in the process.

Get drug treatment in a facility that avails of the pharmaceutical interventions that improve the comfort and odds of success in a drug rehab stay.

Do not gamble with your recovery and with your life by using alternative or untested philosophies of recovery that do not allow for the use of proven safe medications throughout the process. The legacy of abuse leaves a lasting imprint on the neuro chemical workings of the mind, and we would be remiss to not use the tools at our disposal to accelerate the healing of mind and the body.

A lot of things sound pretty convincing when taken at face value…but a little digging and a little research often proves that what seems intuitively correct actually makes very little sense. Before subscribing to an alternative and un medicated philosophy of drug treatment, do your own research and draw your own conclusions. Allowing detox and withdrawal to proceed more painfully than necessary reduces the willingness of people to complete a detoxification, and allowing psychological symptoms of depression and anxiety to continue un medicated throughout recovery lessens the ability to benefit from available psychosocial therapies.

It just doesn’t make any sense to me.

The rehab philosophies that call for a complete abstinence from all drugs and medications during recovery are to my thinking ridiculous. There are hundreds of rehab facilities throughout the U.S. that follow a philosophy of either natural alternative treatment or other alternative quasi scientific ideals of recovery; and as a result many thousands of people endure un medicated drug treatment each year.

  • Firstly, the use of certain medications during rehab can make more humane and comfortable an already very difficult transitory period to sobriety…and what possible harm can a couple of ibuprofens do to a person suffering the pains of opiate withdrawal?
  • Secondly, certain withdrawals can induce acute and even chronic conditions that are either dangerous or even life threatening. Until alternative therapies are clinically proven to reduce the incidence of dangerous convulsive episodes during sedative or alcohol withdrawals, I certainly can’t imagine recommending that anyone I loved endure such a risky period of detox.
  • Thirdly, the use of psychiatric medications can be the difference between depression, anxiety and an inability or unwillingness to actively participate in the lessons of rehab; and symptoms reduction and a better ability to integrate all that rehab offers. Why should people suffering a very difficult period of detox and recovery exacerbate their suffering by adhering to any philosophy of recovery that does not allow for non psychotropic medications? Medications that can both decrease discomfort and also improve an ability to participate enthusiastically in drug treatment and therapies.

I’m all for alternative therapies, and since what works for one person may not work for another, by giving people the widest possible range of tools in their arsenal against addiction, I believe you improve the overall ability to resist temptation. Previously suspiciously regarded therapies such as yoga therapy, meditation therapy, or even karate therapy have all proven clinically beneficial and are now increasingly accepted into mainstream treatments. I do not believe that the recovery methods as used today are good enough, and I am grateful for continuing research in this area that offers hope of improvement. But, although our current methods are imperfect, we should not abandon them for something completely unproven and even medically dangerous; essentially experimental therapy using human guinea pigs in the process.

Get drug treatment in a facility that avails of the pharmaceutical interventions that improve the comfort and odds of success in a drug rehab stay.

Do not gamble with your recovery and with your life by using alternative or untested philosophies of recovery that do not allow for the use of proven safe medications throughout the process. The legacy of abuse leaves a lasting imprint on the neuro chemical workings of the mind, and we would be remiss to not use the tools at our disposal to accelerate the healing of mind and the body.

A lot of things sound pretty convincing when taken at face value…but a little digging and a little research often proves that what seems intuitively correct actually makes very little sense. Before subscribing to an alternative and un medicated philosophy of drug treatment, do your own research and draw your own conclusions. Allowing detox and withdrawal to proceed more painfully than necessary reduces the willingness of people to complete a detoxification, and allowing psychological symptoms of depression and anxiety to continue un medicated throughout recovery lessens the ability to benefit from available psychosocial therapies.

It just doesn’t make any sense to me.

Is a Christian Rehab Right For You?

I’m a Christian, but I doubt my minister could pick me out a lineup…which is understandable, as I’m more of an Easter and weddings and funerals kind of church goer.

Because of this, when my family was arranging for my first stay in rehab they decided that I’d benefit from more of a secular facility, one that removed the word God from the equation; and I can’t argue with success, it worked and I learned a lot of what keeps me sober every day during that month away. But still, when you look at the recovery statistics offered by Christian rehab facilities, they offer a powerful argument for their philosophy of treatment.

Additionally, when most recovery programs are using some form of the 12 steps program as a part of their treatment philosophy, it’s not much of a stretch to start calling "higher power" Jesus Christ, and start praying to someone specific. If you believe in a Christian god, you may want to consider a Christian rehab facility.

Christian rehab works in many ways very similarly to a conventional rehab, and there will be elements, such as a medically supervised detox, cognitive training and drug education that will be almost identical, but where these Christian programs differ is through the use of the bible. A Christian rehab program will incorporate the bible into all aspects of the therapy; and prayer, scripture study and bible group classes will be as much a part of the healing as group sessions are in a conventional rehab.

A Christian rehab program uses the bible to offer the faithful a concrete and lasting guide book to behavior and against temptation. Using the bible as strength and solace, Christian recovery hopefuls learn that the lessons they’re learning are the lessons of the ages, and that even though they may have acted very badly, they can find redemption in the Christian church and in the eyes of God. Christian rehabs don’t ignore what’s good and what’s proven effective in a conventional rehab, but they tend to the spiritual as much as to the physical, and they try to heal the soul as they heal the sins of the body.

I’ve never used a Christian rehab, but if I ever need to go again, I’ll think long and hard about going to a facility that offers the kind of lasting training and spiritual guidance that have proven so effective for so many. You need not be a Christian to participate, but you must be ready to accept Jesus Christ and to use His strength for your salvation. There are many hundreds of Christian rehab facilities and programs across the nation.

I’m a Christian, but I doubt my minister could pick me out a lineup…which is understandable, as I’m more of an Easter and weddings and funerals kind of church goer.

Because of this, when my family was arranging for my first stay in rehab they decided that I’d benefit from more of a secular facility, one that removed the word God from the equation; and I can’t argue with success, it worked and I learned a lot of what keeps me sober every day during that month away. But still, when you look at the recovery statistics offered by Christian rehab facilities, they offer a powerful argument for their philosophy of treatment.

Additionally, when most recovery programs are using some form of the 12 steps program as a part of their treatment philosophy, it’s not much of a stretch to start calling "higher power" Jesus Christ, and start praying to someone specific. If you believe in a Christian god, you may want to consider a Christian rehab facility.

Christian rehab works in many ways very similarly to a conventional rehab, and there will be elements, such as a medically supervised detox, cognitive training and drug education that will be almost identical, but where these Christian programs differ is through the use of the bible. A Christian rehab program will incorporate the bible into all aspects of the therapy; and prayer, scripture study and bible group classes will be as much a part of the healing as group sessions are in a conventional rehab.

A Christian rehab program uses the bible to offer the faithful a concrete and lasting guide book to behavior and against temptation. Using the bible as strength and solace, Christian recovery hopefuls learn that the lessons they’re learning are the lessons of the ages, and that even though they may have acted very badly, they can find redemption in the Christian church and in the eyes of God. Christian rehabs don’t ignore what’s good and what’s proven effective in a conventional rehab, but they tend to the spiritual as much as to the physical, and they try to heal the soul as they heal the sins of the body.

I’ve never used a Christian rehab, but if I ever need to go again, I’ll think long and hard about going to a facility that offers the kind of lasting training and spiritual guidance that have proven so effective for so many. You need not be a Christian to participate, but you must be ready to accept Jesus Christ and to use His strength for your salvation. There are many hundreds of Christian rehab facilities and programs across the nation.