Virtual Drug Rehabs. They’re Coming.

Alcoholic avatars and penny pinching insurance companies – a match made in heaven.

None of us would complain about less time spent wasted in doctor’s waiting rooms, or better and more affordable healthcare! Emerging internet based interactive platforms promise to increase our access to health information and healthcare participation, while allowing a finite number of doctors to treat as many patients – more comprehensively and effectively.

We are not the same group of patients we were 15 years ago. Who goes to the doctor now before taking a self diagnostic tour of internet medical sites? We often scare ourselves with misdiagnoses of terrible diseases, but we endeavor to get informed and by doing so we participate better in the healthcare process – and at its best, healthcare is not passive, but interactive.

The potential for positive change is great – but will the pendulum swing too far? As interactive net based communication between patient and provider improves, will financial pressures compel the e-sourcing of things that just don’t make sense? Will we soon see virtual drug rehabs?

The Good – Where E-Care Makes Sense

Simple and effective online pain management platforms where patients can communicate their symptoms in real time, and longitudinally, to their doctors. Pain patients can create what is essentially an online pain diary – and as they experience pain on a day-to-day basis, they can record information about their symptoms in their diary.

It’s collaborative too. Doctor’s can log on, and given permission, access a patient’s diary, see what’s really happening, and even write notes to the patient in their diary – on a day-to-day basis. Great stuff – It just makes sense. No need to try and explain a history of pain in a 15 minute office appointment, that’s a pretty tough thing to do. Doctors get to see what’s really happening, can make better diagnosis’s and can react to changing symptoms in real time. It provides a way for more accurate information sharing, it saves money and everyone’s time, and it allows doctors to treat their patients more effectively.

That’s the kind of stuff we need. Platforms that improve healthcare efficiency while at best also improving the standard of care, or at the very least – not reducing it.

Except for the very rich, in any country you can name, healthcare systems are overburdened. Resources are finite and never enough to provide optimal care to all that demand it. It’s a fact of life, and for now, it’s just a case of managing the shortfall.

Internet healthcare systems could free up such enormous resources of time and money – ensuring that those that need a hospital bed and a doctor’s care get it – and those that don’t, stay home. How many parents, after some deliberation, make a midnight trip to the emergency room in search of treatment for something that they are 99% sure is not serious? For parents, a 1% chance of tragedy is more than enough to justify a few hours of inconvenience and 99 wasted trips out of a hundred.

On an individual basis, this makes perfect sense – but systematically, it strains resources – and strained resources mean lessened care for everyone.

E-based diagnostic platforms, staffed by doctors and nurses, serving as a front line operation would make sense, and in some jurisdictions, already exist. Get on the video phone, explain the situation, and a lot of the time, they are going to be able to tell you with certainty that there is no need to go to the hospital.

How about on the back end? How many hospital beds stay filled each year by doctors pretty sure that the patient could go home, but wanting one more day of observation – just to be certain. What if those patients that doctors were almost sure were going to be OK – were released one day earlier, but remained linked via web based diagnostics tools? The doctor could still monitor the symptoms in real time – could get someone back to the hospital if needed, but tens of thousands of beds a year would be free to people waiting for them. Better health care for all. Some people would die, but many more people would live – saving more lives for the same expenditure.

The Bad & When Only Face-to-Face Will Do

In the short to mid range future, you need not be terribly imaginative to envision the sort of benefits that interactive net based healthcare services could result in – the two suggested above are only the tip of that iceberg. But there are certain services that do not lend themselves well to distance interaction. Poisoning, trauma, pancreatitis – you can name thousands of conditions that, if you had one, you’d probably want in-person and face-to-face medical care for.

What about addiction counseling? I’d argue that although less obvious and dramatic, it also requires in-person treatment for any real odds of success. I’m not talking about detox, which obviously demands medical supervision; I’m talking about the nuts and bolts of long term treatment – group therapy, cognitive therapy, psychotherapy, etc. A case could be made that such forms of counseling could be provided more cheaply, and with little loss in efficacy, using internet communication technologies. Actually, a case will be made, and e-rehabs are likely on their way.

Addiction though, is tricky. It’s a gestalt kind of disease, in which the sum of the parts never seem to equal the whole, and a disease that demands treatment of a psychological intensity that matches the cognitive manipulations of the disease.

You could arrange for an internet based group therapy session. It would be cheap and easy, but it wouldn’t work very well. Group therapy works when participants are fiercely and honestly involved. You don’t get that when tuning out is as easy as checking your email as you sit in therapy; and manipulations don’t get spotted as they do when you squirm, lying, in person to a group.

You could conveniently get individual therapy at home, over the internet; but the trust building needed for effective counseling takes time in the best of cases, and a situation where the patient is miles removed from the therapist – is not the best of cases for relationship formation. And forget about what our non verbal communication would otherwise reveal.

Could you learn how to make sober friends again, online? Would you really do that yoga – if no one could see what you were up to? Would you tune out, when you didn’t like what you were hearing – sometimes people need a little push to make a breakthrough, but it’s a lot easier to close your browser window than it is to walk out of a therapy session.

Logistically, online addiction treatment is a cakewalk – online addiction treatment that works may be another story.

The Ugly & Financial Pressure

Interactive net communication will create savings opportunities. Ideally, healthcare e-sourcing never harms patient care. The selective application creates a higher standard of individual care in certain areas, and areas unsuited to the application of the e-sourcing benefit from increased funding from the savings – An opportunity for better healthcare, for all.

But if the potential savings in any area become significant enough, there will undoubtedly exist pressure to accept an erosion of healthcare quality in the face of savings – or to put it more bluntly – profit.

Already, consumers with excellent private health coverage who want to get residential drug treatment find that they are obliged to try outpatient first, for a long while, before their insurance company will fund a residential stay. Once insurance companies have an even cheaper option, it’s hard to foresee how they won’t compel us to use it first.

Addiction treatment isn’t like a lot of other disorders. If you had cancer, and the insurance company forced you to try a less expensive procedure first, prior to allowing the more intensive treatment – if that first one didn’t work, you’d be ready that next day to sign up for the better one. Alcoholics and drug addicts are more easily discouraged (or their disease is better at manipulating their behavior) and if the first treatment doesn’t work, odds are it will take a while (if ever) before they approach a second round. A very cynical person might suspect that insurance companies are counting on this…

It will be interesting, and great changes in healthcare over the next decade are a certainty. Most will be positive. The potential for great advances in systematic levels of care exists through the selective application of resource saving distance treatments. There will, I suspect, be an ugly side to it though, and I’d wager virtual drug rehabs will be at the head of that, unfortunate, pack.

I hope I’m wrong though.

Is the Salvation Army Rehab Right for You?

Anyone, rich or poor, can get addiction treatment at the Salvation Army. They do good work and Good Works, and they don’t get the recognition they deserve.

Here’s a testimonial video of a woman describing how the Salvation Army helped her get her life and her Faith back on track.

As a Faith based organization, they aren’t a perfect fit for everyone, but for a lot of us out there who sometimes need a little help, they are always there.

If you need help, remember that with places like the Salvation Army running treatment programs across the country, a lack of funds is no excuse to keep on using.

It’s a nice story of a woman who got the help she needed and made it through.

Anyone, rich or poor, can get addiction treatment at the Salvation Army. They do good work and Good Works, and they don’t get the recognition they deserve.

Here’s a testimonial video of a woman describing how the Salvation Army helped her get her life and her Faith back on track.

As a Faith based organization, they aren’t a perfect fit for everyone, but for a lot of us out there who sometimes need a little help, they are always there.

If you need help, remember that with places like the Salvation Army running treatment programs across the country, a lack of funds is no excuse to keep on using.

It’s a nice story of a woman who got the help she needed and made it through.

Lessons Learned From Calling Rehab Hotlines

I was on the phone yesterday, all day. I had been asked to help find someone a drug rehab that could offer him a private room within his pretty decent insurance constraints.

And I figured it would be a breeze, to find someone a private room for treatment on 20k a month – but as the afternoon crawled on, and I still searched, I eventually had to face the reality – that this wasn’t gonna happen!

I gave up while on the phone with one of the largest addiction treatment organizations in the world. They have 100’s of rehabs under their operational umbrella, and not a one was able to meet his needs. The intake coordinator I was speaking to described the situation to me like this.

One day, years ago, Elizabeth Taylor needed to check into the Betty Ford Center for treatment. She of course expected a private room, and when she was told she couldn’t have one – was furious.

She knew Betty Ford, and no intake woman was going to tell Elizabeth Taylor what she couldn’t have!

So she called Betty on the phone, and she asked what the H*** was going on that she couldn’t have a private room.

And Betty Ford just said no. Hung up the phone and didn’t take any more calls from Elizabeth Taylor until after she came out the other side of treatment.

Haha

Good little story, and the intake counselor told it a whole lot better than I wrote it. She got a laugh out of me, but she also got me thinking that she sounded very well rehearsed in telling that story.

She said that the real reason they very much prefer to have clients bunk up together is to keep people from "isolating". They want to encourage interaction and break people free from unhealthy habits.

They also probably very much like doubling their capacity and revenues – but the lady on the phone didn’t mention anything about that to me.

Man, finding treatment that fits your needs is tough – but the people they’ve got answering those phones sure know how to explain how your needs aren’t really what you need, and how what you really need is what they’ve got! They have an answer for everything, and at first, I think that feels very reassuring to a stressed out treatment seeker.

After too many hours on the phone though, it starts to feel icky. Should talking about a stay in a hospital give off a late-night infomercial vibe?

Man, I don’t know. Maybe it was just too many hours on the phone in a row. I mean the lady who told me the story couldn’t have been nicer, or more knowledgeable – should I complain about someone who has too many answers?

Am I too cynical? What’s your experience been? Tell me I’m wrong!

I was on the phone yesterday, all day. I had been asked to help find someone a drug rehab that could offer him a private room within his pretty decent insurance constraints.

And I figured it would be a breeze, to find someone a private room for treatment on 20k a month – but as the afternoon crawled on, and I still searched, I eventually had to face the reality – that this wasn’t gonna happen!

I gave up while on the phone with one of the largest addiction treatment organizations in the world. They have 100’s of rehabs under their operational umbrella, and not a one was able to meet his needs. The intake coordinator I was speaking to described the situation to me like this.

One day, years ago, Elizabeth Taylor needed to check into the Betty Ford Center for treatment. She of course expected a private room, and when she was told she couldn’t have one – was furious.

She knew Betty Ford, and no intake woman was going to tell Elizabeth Taylor what she couldn’t have!

So she called Betty on the phone, and she asked what the H*** was going on that she couldn’t have a private room.

And Betty Ford just said no. Hung up the phone and didn’t take any more calls from Elizabeth Taylor until after she came out the other side of treatment.

Haha

Good little story, and the intake counselor told it a whole lot better than I wrote it. She got a laugh out of me, but she also got me thinking that she sounded very well rehearsed in telling that story.

She said that the real reason they very much prefer to have clients bunk up together is to keep people from "isolating". They want to encourage interaction and break people free from unhealthy habits.

They also probably very much like doubling their capacity and revenues – but the lady on the phone didn’t mention anything about that to me.

Man, finding treatment that fits your needs is tough – but the people they’ve got answering those phones sure know how to explain how your needs aren’t really what you need, and how what you really need is what they’ve got! They have an answer for everything, and at first, I think that feels very reassuring to a stressed out treatment seeker.

After too many hours on the phone though, it starts to feel icky. Should talking about a stay in a hospital give off a late-night infomercial vibe?

Man, I don’t know. Maybe it was just too many hours on the phone in a row. I mean the lady who told me the story couldn’t have been nicer, or more knowledgeable – should I complain about someone who has too many answers?

Am I too cynical? What’s your experience been? Tell me I’m wrong!

Commit a Crime – Win Free Drug Treatment!

Yay Drug Courts! It’s hard to find anyone these days with much of anything bad to say about drug courts. These alternative sentencing vehicles are saving tax payers a huge amount of money, they are freeing up space in overcrowded jails, they are helping people in need beat terrible addictions, reuniting families and the recidivism rates for drug court graduates are far lower than for offenders processed through the traditional court system. Yay! Seriously, they work, and they save everyone money, and it’s great news that drug courts are now in operation in all 50 states, with a total of 2000 in operation or in the works. But They have created a rather strange set of circumstances.

  • If you are poor, addicted to drugs and alcohol and really want some help to get better – but are not a criminal – you are out of luck.
  • If you are poor, addicted to drugs or alcohol, don’t care if you get help or not, and commit crimes – then you get free drug treatment.

It’s an absurdity, and I have spoken with a few people over the last months who find themselves in this frustrating predicament. It seems to them, that the only way they are going to be able to get drug treatment, is by being arrested for a crime. Not ideal Drug courts aren’t going away, nor should they. They work better than the traditional court system, they are more humane and they treat the root cause of such a lot of the criminal behavior in this country today. But why should we wait to provide funding for people only after they commit crimes? Why not give them a leg up before it gets to that stage? Let’s keep the drug courts, but expand the programming so that anyone in need can have access to the same sorts of treatment programs. Maybe that will cut down on the eventual need for courts and drug courts alike, while saving a great deal of tax-payer money on everything from law-enforcement to welfare to health care. Besides, it’s the right thing to do – and it’s only fair.

Yay Drug Courts! It’s hard to find anyone these days with much of anything bad to say about drug courts. These alternative sentencing vehicles are saving tax payers a huge amount of money, they are freeing up space in overcrowded jails, they are helping people in need beat terrible addictions, reuniting families and the recidivism rates for drug court graduates are far lower than for offenders processed through the traditional court system. Yay! Seriously, they work, and they save everyone money, and it’s great news that drug courts are now in operation in all 50 states, with a total of 2000 in operation or in the works. But They have created a rather strange set of circumstances.

  • If you are poor, addicted to drugs and alcohol and really want some help to get better – but are not a criminal – you are out of luck.
  • If you are poor, addicted to drugs or alcohol, don’t care if you get help or not, and commit crimes – then you get free drug treatment.

It’s an absurdity, and I have spoken with a few people over the last months who find themselves in this frustrating predicament. It seems to them, that the only way they are going to be able to get drug treatment, is by being arrested for a crime. Not ideal Drug courts aren’t going away, nor should they. They work better than the traditional court system, they are more humane and they treat the root cause of such a lot of the criminal behavior in this country today. But why should we wait to provide funding for people only after they commit crimes? Why not give them a leg up before it gets to that stage? Let’s keep the drug courts, but expand the programming so that anyone in need can have access to the same sorts of treatment programs. Maybe that will cut down on the eventual need for courts and drug courts alike, while saving a great deal of tax-payer money on everything from law-enforcement to welfare to health care. Besides, it’s the right thing to do – and it’s only fair.

Addiction Recovery…Don’t Do It Alone

We, as humans, are social animals.

From birth we learn from our family; as children, friends take on a bigger role until when in our teens, the collective wisdom of our peers exerts a primal influence. As adults we tend to think it all past us, but in reality our peer environment still influences our actions and perceptions, and the people we choose to associate with tend to have a profound impact on our lives.

And this is why although recovery alone is possible, recovery in a group is far more possible, and for the best likelihood of success recovery should harness the power of the group.

As using addicts or alcoholics, we tend to associate socially with others who share our life-focus for intoxication; it’s a natural byproduct of the disease! We take our social cues from our group of peers, and in a big way what we perceive to be acceptable standards of behaviors are derived from what others around us are also doing.

If I drink 12 beers a day but my friend drinks 24 beers a day, well, I’m a moderate drinker!

Getting into rehab offers a lot. It offers a period of enforced sobriety, which can transform a life on its own. It offers the wisdom and guidance of addictions professionals, and it offers classes in relapse avoidance and life skills that impart the tools we’ll need to succeed. But more, much more than this, it also offers us the inspiration of others also in recovery.

We learn through the process of group recovery that although we are unique as individuals, our problems with drugs and alcohol share an incredible similarity. We also see that if others, who have it just as bad as we do, can recover – then there is no reason why we can’t too. There is a real sense of inspiration that comes from working together towards a common goal with others who share the same troubles; and it can work a real magic on even the most reluctant and hard-headed of addicts.

Rehab is supposed to be a place of transformation, and there is true power in this collective effort of recovery. You might be able to do it alone, but it’s easier and far more likely done in a group setting.

Find a place of healing where you can find your inspiration. Find a group of fellow alcoholics or addicts who understand you as you understand them, and start your journey towards recovery together. It helps.

We, as humans, are social animals.

From birth we learn from our family; as children, friends take on a bigger role until when in our teens, the collective wisdom of our peers exerts a primal influence. As adults we tend to think it all past us, but in reality our peer environment still influences our actions and perceptions, and the people we choose to associate with tend to have a profound impact on our lives.

And this is why although recovery alone is possible, recovery in a group is far more possible, and for the best likelihood of success recovery should harness the power of the group.

As using addicts or alcoholics, we tend to associate socially with others who share our life-focus for intoxication; it’s a natural byproduct of the disease! We take our social cues from our group of peers, and in a big way what we perceive to be acceptable standards of behaviors are derived from what others around us are also doing.

If I drink 12 beers a day but my friend drinks 24 beers a day, well, I’m a moderate drinker!

Getting into rehab offers a lot. It offers a period of enforced sobriety, which can transform a life on its own. It offers the wisdom and guidance of addictions professionals, and it offers classes in relapse avoidance and life skills that impart the tools we’ll need to succeed. But more, much more than this, it also offers us the inspiration of others also in recovery.

We learn through the process of group recovery that although we are unique as individuals, our problems with drugs and alcohol share an incredible similarity. We also see that if others, who have it just as bad as we do, can recover – then there is no reason why we can’t too. There is a real sense of inspiration that comes from working together towards a common goal with others who share the same troubles; and it can work a real magic on even the most reluctant and hard-headed of addicts.

Rehab is supposed to be a place of transformation, and there is true power in this collective effort of recovery. You might be able to do it alone, but it’s easier and far more likely done in a group setting.

Find a place of healing where you can find your inspiration. Find a group of fellow alcoholics or addicts who understand you as you understand them, and start your journey towards recovery together. It helps.

How to Find a Rehab You Can Afford

How much will it cost, where can I go, who can I trust and what can I do if I don’t have any money… but really need some help?

Although making the decision to get professional help takes you a giant step forward to getting better, even after you have committed to change the difficulties involved in selecting an appropriate and affordable service provider can easily overwhelm; and the sad fact is that far too many people who do want to get help just get discouraged by the high costs, the waiting lists and the sales pitches from private clinics who may or may not have your best interests in mind.

Here is a step by step guide that you may use to help you to better understand your options, and get you started in narrowing down the available and affordable providers in your area.

In broad terms, your drug and alcohol rehab options may be subdivided into 4 distinct categories.

  1. Private or non profit but expensive drug and alcohol rehabs.
  2. State run rehabs or state funded slots in a program.
  3. Low cost drug or alcohol rehabs that do not require state funding or Medicaid
  4. Totally free drug and alcohol rehabs and sober living environments, many Christian in nature, but a good number of secular options as well.

There is some truth in the saying "you get what you pay for" and in general, the higher the cost of the rehab the more comfortable the facilities, the shorter the waiting period and the greater intensity in group and individual therapy as offered. There are however some real lemons in all price ranges, and you do want to ensure that any rehab under consideration enjoys a good reputation for services provided.

How to Find a Rehab

In general, you should approach this list as 1-4 in order of desirability and action. If you have good private insurance, use it and get the best; it’s well worth it. If you can access state funded treatment and the waiting list is acceptable, you may get high quality free care including medical detox. If you can’t access state funded care or the wait is just too long, find a private rehab in your area that offers very low cost care, and get into treatment quickly. If you can’t access state care, have no insurance, have no money to pay for any form of treatment…you can still get care and get it soon, look into totally free rehabs and long term care facilities as a last option. Whatever you do, get help and get it quickly. Any form of residential treatment is far preferable to months or years of continuing abuse.

1) If You Have Private Health Insurance…Use It!

This is what you’ve been paying towards all those yeas, and you are entitled to coverage for your medically necessary treatment. The degree of coverage as offered varies greatly between companies and even between coverage plans, but as a first step, you need to call you insurance provider and find out just how much you are entitled to. If your policy information is dated, you should not rely solely on your at home resource materials. There have been some legislative changes for the better over the past years and you may be covered for more than you think you are. You may be covered for all or nearly all of the cost of a private residential facility; and if this is the case you could be getting care tomorrow at a top quality facility. Even if your insurance company will pay for a substantial portion of the costs, you don’t want to waste your energy, time and hope at a substandard facility.

Please feel free to contact us at www.ChooseHelp.com for recommendations or help in selecting a quality private rehab in your area. You may find that your insurance provider will only cover a portion of your care and that to enroll in a quality private rehab you will need to contribute a substantial amount of money. No one enjoys paying for care, but if you can afford it, if you can get reasonable credit to finance your stay, or if you can borrow the money from family; you may want to consider your contribution as a worthy investment in your future health and happiness.

It can be pretty expensive, but then again, so are drugs and alcohol; and if you factor in the savings from abuse, the savings of better health, and the likelihood that you will excel in your career once sober, getting better always makes good financial sense…whatever the initial cost.

2) Your State Addictions Agency is there to Help

If you have no private health insurance and lack the means for expensive private rehab facility self payments, your first step towards care should be contacting your local county mental health and addictions services board.

Even if you do not currently qualify for Medicaid, if you lack insurance coverage, and meet certain low income criteria, you may be eligible for free or very low cost local care. Some publicly funded facilities provide an excellent standard of care, but in general, due to funding limitations you cannot expect the same degree of privacy and comfort, of individual therapies and of quick entry as with private care. Many people will qualify for state funded rehab slots but because of high demand, the waiting period for services can be long.

Still, it’s very much worth a couple of phone calls and a trip to your county health office to find out if you are eligible for state funded care.

3) Low-cost community or private care

If you have no private insurance and do not qualify for state funding, or do qualify, but don’t want to wait for weeks or months for care, your next step would be to contact local low-cost residential rehabilitation programs in your area. Many base their fee assessment on a sliding scale of income, and will work with you to ensure that you can get the care you need at a price you can afford, and many self mandate that no one be turned away for financial reasons.

The majority of facilities in this sector fall into either Christian rehab care or long term sober living residences and both may be a good fit for you. Christian programs may offer very low cost care to those in need, and sober living homes may not require any money up front, and only demand that after a specified period you gain employment and contribute a low monthly rent to the maintenance of the house. You may also find a local residential rehab in your area offering services at a full price of less than $1000 per week, with fee discounts available based on need. Please see the list of state facilities in your area for details. If you cannot find a suitable facility in your area, the local Church, Mosque or Temple can be a great resources for low cost options, and your Pastor, Imam, Priest or Rabbi will very likely know of local faith based low cost rehabs.

4) Totally free care

For those in real need, and for those without the ability to pay anything towards the cost of their care, their still exist hundreds of completely free residential rehab programs. The Salvation Army runs almost 200 long term rehab programs nation wide without asking a penny, and the Union and Baptist Missions run a similar number. Most will ask a long term commitment to care and most will have structured and strict rules of conduct, but they act only out of a desire to serve and out of real experience towards your recovery. Some programs may have waiting lists, but in general these waiting periods are far shorter than for comparable free care within state funded rehabs, and you may not need wait at all for entry into a program. Most free care providers will demand that you show a sincere personal motivation to change as a criterion for admission.

Private facilities do not request this, which is fortunate as statistics show that a person’s motivation for entry has very little influence over the eventual success rates.

Contact me if you need help locating a low cost drug rehab in your area. You Can Get the help you Need

Even if you have no insurance, have no money and don’t qualify for Medicaid, you still have hundreds of options available to you, and some of these offer a very high standard of care. If you want to get help…you can. Don’t wait another day before starting the journey to health, sobriety and happiness. It’s not going to be easy, there are no guarantees, and the process can be painful; but the payoff at the end makes it all worthwhile. With sobriety you will perform better at work, greatly improve your health and your ultimate lifespan, contribute fairly to your family and no longer act in ways that make you ashamed, but over which you seem to have little control. You can get better, there is always hope.

Alcohol and Drug Rehab Directory
A directory of reputable and ethical alcohol and drug rehab centers.

How much will it cost, where can I go, who can I trust and what can I do if I don’t have any money… but really need some help?

Although making the decision to get professional help takes you a giant step forward to getting better, even after you have committed to change the difficulties involved in selecting an appropriate and affordable service provider can easily overwhelm; and the sad fact is that far too many people who do want to get help just get discouraged by the high costs, the waiting lists and the sales pitches from private clinics who may or may not have your best interests in mind.

Here is a step by step guide that you may use to help you to better understand your options, and get you started in narrowing down the available and affordable providers in your area.

In broad terms, your drug and alcohol rehab options may be subdivided into 4 distinct categories.

  1. Private or non profit but expensive drug and alcohol rehabs.
  2. State run rehabs or state funded slots in a program.
  3. Low cost drug or alcohol rehabs that do not require state funding or Medicaid
  4. Totally free drug and alcohol rehabs and sober living environments, many Christian in nature, but a good number of secular options as well.

There is some truth in the saying “you get what you pay for” and in general, the higher the cost of the rehab the more comfortable the facilities, the shorter the waiting period and the greater intensity in group and individual therapy as offered. There are however some real lemons in all price ranges, and you do want to ensure that any rehab under consideration enjoys a good reputation for services provided.

How to Find a Rehab

In general, you should approach this list as 1-4 in order of desirability and action. If you have good private insurance, use it and get the best; it’s well worth it. If you can access state funded treatment and the waiting list is acceptable, you may get high quality free care including medical detox. If you can’t access state funded care or the wait is just too long, find a private rehab in your area that offers very low cost care, and get into treatment quickly. If you can’t access state care, have no insurance, have no money to pay for any form of treatment…you can still get care and get it soon, look into totally free rehabs and long term care facilities as a last option. Whatever you do, get help and get it quickly. Any form of residential treatment is far preferable to months or years of continuing abuse.

1) If You Have Private Health Insurance…Use It!

This is what you’ve been paying towards all those yeas, and you are entitled to coverage for your medically necessary treatment. The degree of coverage as offered varies greatly between companies and even between coverage plans, but as a first step, you need to call you insurance provider and find out just how much you are entitled to. If your policy information is dated, you should not rely solely on your at home resource materials. There have been some legislative changes for the better over the past years and you may be covered for more than you think you are. You may be covered for all or nearly all of the cost of a private residential facility; and if this is the case you could be getting care tomorrow at a top quality facility. Even if your insurance company will pay for a substantial portion of the costs, you don’t want to waste your energy, time and hope at a substandard facility.

Please feel free to contact us at www.ChooseHelp.com for recommendations or help in selecting a quality private rehab in your area. You may find that your insurance provider will only cover a portion of your care and that to enroll in a quality private rehab you will need to contribute a substantial amount of money. No one enjoys paying for care, but if you can afford it, if you can get reasonable credit to finance your stay, or if you can borrow the money from family; you may want to consider your contribution as a worthy investment in your future health and happiness.

It can be pretty expensive, but then again, so are drugs and alcohol; and if you factor in the savings from abuse, the savings of better health, and the likelihood that you will excel in your career once sober, getting better always makes good financial sense…whatever the initial cost.

2) Your State Addictions Agency is there to Help

If you have no private health insurance and lack the means for expensive private rehab facility self payments, your first step towards care should be contacting your local county mental health and addictions services board.

Even if you do not currently qualify for Medicaid, if you lack insurance coverage, and meet certain low income criteria, you may be eligible for free or very low cost local care. Some publicly funded facilities provide an excellent standard of care, but in general, due to funding limitations you cannot expect the same degree of privacy and comfort, of individual therapies and of quick entry as with private care. Many people will qualify for state funded rehab slots but because of high demand, the waiting period for services can be long.

Still, it’s very much worth a couple of phone calls and a trip to your county health office to find out if you are eligible for state funded care.

3) Low-cost community or private care

If you have no private insurance and do not qualify for state funding, or do qualify, but don’t want to wait for weeks or months for care, your next step would be to contact local low-cost residential rehabilitation programs in your area. Many base their fee assessment on a sliding scale of income, and will work with you to ensure that you can get the care you need at a price you can afford, and many self mandate that no one be turned away for financial reasons.

The majority of facilities in this sector fall into either Christian rehab care or long term sober living residences and both may be a good fit for you. Christian programs may offer very low cost care to those in need, and sober living homes may not require any money up front, and only demand that after a specified period you gain employment and contribute a low monthly rent to the maintenance of the house. You may also find a local residential rehab in your area offering services at a full price of less than $1000 per week, with fee discounts available based on need. Please see the list of state facilities in your area for details. If you cannot find a suitable facility in your area, the local Church, Mosque or Temple can be a great resources for low cost options, and your Pastor, Imam, Priest or Rabbi will very likely know of local faith based low cost rehabs.

4) Totally free care

For those in real need, and for those without the ability to pay anything towards the cost of their care, their still exist hundreds of completely free residential rehab programs. The Salvation Army runs almost 200 long term rehab programs nation wide without asking a penny, and the Union and Baptist Missions run a similar number. Most will ask a long term commitment to care and most will have structured and strict rules of conduct, but they act only out of a desire to serve and out of real experience towards your recovery. Some programs may have waiting lists, but in general these waiting periods are far shorter than for comparable free care within state funded rehabs, and you may not need wait at all for entry into a program. Most free care providers will demand that you show a sincere personal motivation to change as a criterion for admission.

Private facilities do not request this, which is fortunate as statistics show that a person’s motivation for entry has very little influence over the eventual success rates.

Contact me if you need help locating a low cost drug rehab in your area. You Can Get the help you Need

Even if you have no insurance, have no money and don’t qualify for Medicaid, you still have hundreds of options available to you, and some of these offer a very high standard of care. If you want to get help…you can. Don’t wait another day before starting the journey to health, sobriety and happiness. It’s not going to be easy, there are no guarantees, and the process can be painful; but the payoff at the end makes it all worthwhile. With sobriety you will perform better at work, greatly improve your health and your ultimate lifespan, contribute fairly to your family and no longer act in ways that make you ashamed, but over which you seem to have little control. You can get better, there is always hope.

Alcohol and Drug Rehab Directory
A directory of reputable and ethical alcohol and drug rehab centers.

Take a Step Forwards to a Better Tomorrow

Try typing affordable drug rehab into Google, you’ll get a lot of hits, but you can be sure the first 500 won’t be affordable! The sad reality is that too many people with temporary motivations to get better just get so frustrated and deterred by the stress and challenge of finding affordable care that they just give up.

Even if you have quality and comprehensive private health coverage, you don’t want to waste your time and your hope on a poor quality treatment experience; it’s your life and your health and happiness that are at stake, and you don’t want to make a mistake. If you don’t have comprehensive insurance coverage the situation grows even more difficult. Where can you go for rehab you can afford; who will help you when you can’t afford an expensive up front fee? Recognizing the problems inherent in getting into appropriate and affordable treatment, I have compiled a resource book designed to assist you in understanding your options, your rights and even your needs; and to help you in locating an affordable residential rehab program that’s going to work for you.

Some of the questions that I have struggled with include:

Do I need rehab?

What kind of rehab do I need?

How much does rehab cost?

What type of rehab can I afford?

Where can I go to find low cost help?

How can I get a family member into rehab?

What can family do to help during and after rehab?

Do I need to detox first? What about rehab for my­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ special need?

What are some phone numbers for low cost rehabs in my area?

Where else can I get information on addiction, rehabs and recovery?

I hope you will find the answers to all of these questions and more contained within, and I believe that everyone can find treatment in a timely manner and at a price they can afford, they simply need to know where to look. Please contact me if you need any help in finding affordable care.

You can get better; it will be hard…and it will be worth it!

Try typing affordable drug rehab into Google, you’ll get a lot of hits, but you can be sure the first 500 won’t be affordable! The sad reality is that too many people with temporary motivations to get better just get so frustrated and deterred by the stress and challenge of finding affordable care that they just give up.

Even if you have quality and comprehensive private health coverage, you don’t want to waste your time and your hope on a poor quality treatment experience; it’s your life and your health and happiness that are at stake, and you don’t want to make a mistake. If you don’t have comprehensive insurance coverage the situation grows even more difficult. Where can you go for rehab you can afford; who will help you when you can’t afford an expensive up front fee? Recognizing the problems inherent in getting into appropriate and affordable treatment, I have compiled a resource book designed to assist you in understanding your options, your rights and even your needs; and to help you in locating an affordable residential rehab program that’s going to work for you.

Some of the questions that I have struggled with include:

Do I need rehab?

What kind of rehab do I need?

How much does rehab cost?

What type of rehab can I afford?

Where can I go to find low cost help?

How can I get a family member into rehab?

What can family do to help during and after rehab?

Do I need to detox first? What about rehab for my­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ special need?

What are some phone numbers for low cost rehabs in my area?

Where else can I get information on addiction, rehabs and recovery?

I hope you will find the answers to all of these questions and more contained within, and I believe that everyone can find treatment in a timely manner and at a price they can afford, they simply need to know where to look. Please contact me if you need any help in finding affordable care.

You can get better; it will be hard…and it will be worth it!