The Marlboro Man is LYING!!! (on Video)

Tobacco companies spend 26 million dollars a day on ads – which they say have no effect on convincing new smokers to pick up the habit…

Alcohol ads cost the industry 3 billion dollars per year – the majority targeted at young drinkers. Why do 80% of beer company websites use cartoons and rock star promotions, while only 10% of wine websites do…? Could it be that brewers are after that 5 billion dollar a year underage college binge drinking market?

Interesting facts from a thought provoking short video piece that discusses how alcohol and tobacco advertising has educated generations of Americans on the 2 most widely used drugs.

You’ll never look at the Marlboro Man the same way again.

6 minutes well spent.

 

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Tobacco companies spend 26 million dollars a day on ads – which they say have no effect on convincing new smokers to pick up the habit…

Alcohol ads cost the industry 3 billion dollars per year – the majority targeted at young drinkers. Why do 80% of beer company websites use cartoons and rock star promotions, while only 10% of wine websites do…? Could it be that brewers are after that 5 billion dollar a year underage college binge drinking market?

Interesting facts from a thought provoking short video piece that discusses how alcohol and tobacco advertising has educated generations of Americans on the 2 most widely used drugs.

You’ll never look at the Marlboro Man the same way again.

6 minutes well spent.

 

Which Beer Companies Target Kids Most?

The American beer and liquor industries have long argued that they are capable of self regulation and have agreed to voluntarily monitor their marketing practices to reduce the exposure of alcohol advertising on underage drinkers.

Hmm….

  • In 2001 the average teen saw 216 beer or liquor TV commercials
  • In 2007 the average teen saw 301 beer or liquor TV commercials

Is self regulation working?

What’s happening says David H. Jernigan, of the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at Georgetown University, is that these marketing boards have simply switched their targeting away from networks and on to cable channels – and cable channels are where most youth are now getting bombarded with ads promoting a glamorous liquor soaked lifestyle.

And on the internet – even further below government’s regulatory radar – things are far worse.

Allowing an industry that needs young drinkers (both of age and underage) for continuing profitability to self regulate its marketing practices is an absurdity.

The Best and Worst?

The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth has spotlighted certain brands as high or low performing in reducing teen ad slot exposure.

The worst offenders (Showing the most ads in slots viewed by teens):

  • Bud Light
  • Coors Light
  • Miller Light
  • Mike’s Hard Lemonade
  • Smirnoff Vodka
  • Hennessey Cognac

The most responsible brands (Targeting more strongly adult viewed content):

  • Rolling Rock
  • Michelob
  • Michelob Ultra Light
  • Arbor Mist

Source – the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at Georgetown University 

The American beer and liquor industries have long argued that they are capable of self regulation and have agreed to voluntarily monitor their marketing practices to reduce the exposure of alcohol advertising on underage drinkers.

Hmm….

  • In 2001 the average teen saw 216 beer or liquor TV commercials
  • In 2007 the average teen saw 301 beer or liquor TV commercials

Is self regulation working?

What’s happening says David H. Jernigan, of the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at Georgetown University, is that these marketing boards have simply switched their targeting away from networks and on to cable channels – and cable channels are where most youth are now getting bombarded with ads promoting a glamorous liquor soaked lifestyle.

And on the internet – even further below government’s regulatory radar – things are far worse.

Allowing an industry that needs young drinkers (both of age and underage) for continuing profitability to self regulate its marketing practices is an absurdity.

The Best and Worst?

The Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth has spotlighted certain brands as high or low performing in reducing teen ad slot exposure.

The worst offenders (Showing the most ads in slots viewed by teens):

  • Bud Light
  • Coors Light
  • Miller Light
  • Mike’s Hard Lemonade
  • Smirnoff Vodka
  • Hennessey Cognac

The most responsible brands (Targeting more strongly adult viewed content):

  • Rolling Rock
  • Michelob
  • Michelob Ultra Light
  • Arbor Mist

Source – the Center on Alcohol Marketing and Youth at Georgetown University 

Are the French Smarter Than Us? On Alcohol Advertising They Sure Are

You can tell the world about your product, about why it tastes better or about how it was made, but in France at least, if you’re selling alcohol, that’s about all you can say.

You cannot imply that drinking makes life more fun. You cannot imply that alcohol is cool, or sophisticated or stylish or worldly and you cannot imply that by drinking alcohol you will become better looking, more likable or successful. In short, everything that American alcohol advertisers do – they cannot.

And the French enforce it too, recent rulings against Heineken and Moet Champagne for minor transgressions shows the teeth in this legislation of public health promotion.

And they’re smart to do so, as studies consistently and conclusively show that alcohol advertising does predispose kids to drink, and helps people feel OK about drinking to excess.

We shouldn’t ban alcohol advertising, but this time – the French have hit a home run, and we should have the courage to follow in their footsteps.

You can tell the world about your product, about why it tastes better or about how it was made, but in France at least, if you’re selling alcohol, that’s about all you can say.

You cannot imply that drinking makes life more fun. You cannot imply that alcohol is cool, or sophisticated or stylish or worldly and you cannot imply that by drinking alcohol you will become better looking, more likable or successful. In short, everything that American alcohol advertisers do – they cannot.

And the French enforce it too, recent rulings against Heineken and Moet Champagne for minor transgressions shows the teeth in this legislation of public health promotion.

And they’re smart to do so, as studies consistently and conclusively show that alcohol advertising does predispose kids to drink, and helps people feel OK about drinking to excess.

We shouldn’t ban alcohol advertising, but this time – the French have hit a home run, and we should have the courage to follow in their footsteps.