In The War on Drugs – Are We Trying to Kill Drug Users?

Prison is not a particularly safe place to live. For newly freed inmates however, the streets are even more dangerous.

Australian researchers examined the mortality rate of newly released prisoners, looking at the risk of death during the first two weeks after release. They call it carnage. Newly released men are 29 times more likely that the general population to die during that first 2 weeks – women are 69 times more likely to die – 69 times more likely.

What’s killing them?

Drug overdoses mostly. It seems as though prison isn’t doing much to break long dormant opiate habits, and the newly released addicted are soon back to their old ways – minus any real tolerance for the drugs. They are shooting heroin, and what used to be a manageable dose is now a fatal dose, and that’s the end of that story. We think that a death sentence for non violent drug crimes is unreasonable – but what we give, when we sentence heroin addicts to prison – is pretty close to capital punishment anyway.

Read more about it in the February 2008 edition of the journal, "Addiction".

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Prison is not a particularly safe place to live. For newly freed inmates however, the streets are even more dangerous.

Australian researchers examined the mortality rate of newly released prisoners, looking at the risk of death during the first two weeks after release. They call it carnage. Newly released men are 29 times more likely that the general population to die during that first 2 weeks – women are 69 times more likely to die – 69 times more likely.

What’s killing them?

Drug overdoses mostly. It seems as though prison isn’t doing much to break long dormant opiate habits, and the newly released addicted are soon back to their old ways – minus any real tolerance for the drugs. They are shooting heroin, and what used to be a manageable dose is now a fatal dose, and that’s the end of that story. We think that a death sentence for non violent drug crimes is unreasonable – but what we give, when we sentence heroin addicts to prison – is pretty close to capital punishment anyway.

Read more about it in the February 2008 edition of the journal, "Addiction".

One thought on “In The War on Drugs – Are We Trying to Kill Drug Users?”

  1. Dear Kingwood Pines Hospital
    2001 Ladbrook Dr. Kingwood, TX 77339.

    My daughter went into inpatient care at the end of December, she was taken to your hospital by my husband and myself. She has first abused a prescription for Lorazepam, next she took to many flexeril, then she stole 60 1mg tabs of Xanax from me that she tried to over dose on by taking too many and drinking alcohol. She also was smoking marijuana and who know what else. She stayed at your hospital for a few days to detox and now she sees you on outpatient basis. My daughter is 19 so even thought her care is being paid by our insurance her information is private, and that is O.K. with me. I was looking at my insurance information and the bills from the hospital and I noticed that she was on several prescriptions, Trazodone, for a sleep aid, Naproxin, (for back?) smz-tmpds tab (urinary tract infection) Gabapentin aka Nuerotin. (off label use for Bi-Polar disorder) Carbamezepine aka Equerto,
    She has also been prescribed Robaxin to take three times a day and Larazepam 2mg two times a day. My daughter has never had a history of mental illness or back problems. My concern is that I sent her to your hospital to detox, not to have prescriptions for the very type of drugs that she tried to overdose on. While she was in your hospital she was diagnosed with Bipolar a mood disorder, I can assure you that it was a drug induced mood disorder. Bipolor is a chemical imbalance in your brain yet Dr.’s diagnose it with a questionnaire. This just happens to be one of the easiest diagnosis to get in America. My concern is that she says she is trying to live a clean life now, but she doped up on the very same types of prescriptions that she tried to abuse. Also I am aware of all the amazing stories she tells and the drama she produces with her stories to get what she wants, and to make you feel sorry for her she is quite a player. I was also noticing that you are giving her 60, 2mg tabs at a time of Lorazapam, I am retentively sure that is enough to kill her, the next time she wants to take high numbers of multiple prescriptions and drink alcohol and use prescription drug to the point she passes out. I am only looking out for my daughter, I do not blame you because I do not know all the facts, because she is 19 and has her privacy, for instance giving her lorazapam for a detox medicine after she tried to kill herself with Xanax would in my opinion would not be such a good idea, But maybe if she was trying to detox from Xanax and say herion, well mabey that is a better choice. Anyway my point of view rather it is right or wrong, due to circumstances that I am unaware of, I sent her to you for an alcohol and prescription drug problem and ten-thousand dollars later she has a prescriptions for the very same kind of drugs she was “addicted” to, and taking more medication than she has every taken in her life, and she calls this clean living?????????????
    Please advise!

    I want you to know I am keeping track of what you are doing.

    Like

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