No More Rock Bottom!

A survey done by Hazeldean (One of the nation’s most respected drug and alcohol rehabs and source of addictions research) reveals that 70% of all alcoholics in recovery got help initially at the urging or intervention of a friend, family member or employer.

So much for the theory of rock bottom…

No one ever needs to hit rock bottom, and really, where’s the bottom anyways? Alcoholism and addiction are progressive and ultimately fatal diseases, and for too many the only bottom is death.

There’s no need for it and it’s a tragedy that this myth of rock bottom continues to pervade our pop culture consciousness.

There are few easy answers, and fewer guarantees. Addiction is powerful, cunning and baffling (to borrow an old AA phrase) and what works for one may not work for another. Yet amongst all this uncertainty, one facet of treatment has been shown over and over again to have incredible efficacy, at getting people into treatment at the very least.

The Intervention

Interventions work; they work wonders, and a well run, non confrontational and caring intervention almost always breaks down the walls of denial, and gets a loved one into treatment.

Addiction is rarely intuitive or logical, and as such it makes perverse sense then that research shows that a person’s motivation at the outset for seeking help has no bearing whatsoever on eventual success and sobriety rates. Walking through that treatment center front door, or pushed in kicking and screaming…the only thing that matters is that you get into treatment, and start learning how to do better.

Never wait for rock bottom, by then it may be too late. Why waste years of precious life, why let the disease entrench ever further?

The sooner an addict or alcoholic gets help, the better the treatment prognosis. Family can make a difference, family can save a life. Learn about what works, learn about interventions, and take a stand against addiction and pain.

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A survey done by Hazeldean (One of the nation’s most respected drug and alcohol rehabs and source of addictions research) reveals that 70% of all alcoholics in recovery got help initially at the urging or intervention of a friend, family member or employer.

So much for the theory of rock bottom…

No one ever needs to hit rock bottom, and really, where’s the bottom anyways? Alcoholism and addiction are progressive and ultimately fatal diseases, and for too many the only bottom is death.

There’s no need for it and it’s a tragedy that this myth of rock bottom continues to pervade our pop culture consciousness.

There are few easy answers, and fewer guarantees. Addiction is powerful, cunning and baffling (to borrow an old AA phrase) and what works for one may not work for another. Yet amongst all this uncertainty, one facet of treatment has been shown over and over again to have incredible efficacy, at getting people into treatment at the very least.

The Intervention

Interventions work; they work wonders, and a well run, non confrontational and caring intervention almost always breaks down the walls of denial, and gets a loved one into treatment.

Addiction is rarely intuitive or logical, and as such it makes perverse sense then that research shows that a person’s motivation at the outset for seeking help has no bearing whatsoever on eventual success and sobriety rates. Walking through that treatment center front door, or pushed in kicking and screaming…the only thing that matters is that you get into treatment, and start learning how to do better.

Never wait for rock bottom, by then it may be too late. Why waste years of precious life, why let the disease entrench ever further?

The sooner an addict or alcoholic gets help, the better the treatment prognosis. Family can make a difference, family can save a life. Learn about what works, learn about interventions, and take a stand against addiction and pain.

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