Why would anyone use methadone?

I’m not talking about, why would anyone use methadone instead of cold turkey detox, I’m talking about why would anyone in their right mind use methadone instead of buprenorphine?

Really…I want to know, so if you’ve chosen methadone over buprenorphine or suboxone…why??? Firstly, I should say that I never used either in my battles with opiate type pain pills, but I understand and respect the use of opiate substitution as a valid and respectable choice in a recovery program. But I just don’t get what’s better about methadone.

The drug is more easily abused You have to go to a clinic to take it It is very addictive The eventual detox off of methadone is terrible

So why, when buprenorphine has little potential for abuse, and can be prescribed in a month’ supply, when it’s far less addictive than methadone and when the eventual withdrawal and detox pains are nowhere near as bad as for methadone…why?

I know that there are some problems with finding a doctor capable of prescribing the drug in some parts of the country, and I also know that it is more expensive, but when you consider the cost benefit ration and weigh the options, buprenorphine just seem to me to come up a clear winner. So if any one can answer me this question, I would love to know why so many people still choose methadone.

I’m not talking about, why would anyone use methadone instead of cold turkey detox, I’m talking about why would anyone in their right mind use methadone instead of buprenorphine?

Really…I want to know, so if you’ve chosen methadone over buprenorphine or suboxone…why??? Firstly, I should say that I never used either in my battles with opiate type pain pills, but I understand and respect the use of opiate substitution as a valid and respectable choice in a recovery program. But I just don’t get what’s better about methadone.

The drug is more easily abused You have to go to a clinic to take it It is very addictive The eventual detox off of methadone is terrible

So why, when buprenorphine has little potential for abuse, and can be prescribed in a month’ supply, when it’s far less addictive than methadone and when the eventual withdrawal and detox pains are nowhere near as bad as for methadone…why?

I know that there are some problems with finding a doctor capable of prescribing the drug in some parts of the country, and I also know that it is more expensive, but when you consider the cost benefit ration and weigh the options, buprenorphine just seem to me to come up a clear winner. So if any one can answer me this question, I would love to know why so many people still choose methadone.

The Family Intervention. Run One that’s Going to Work!

What is an Intervention?

During an intervention, all family and close friends (and any other people of influence in the addict’s life) will joint together to confront the addict in a unified and structured manner. Denial is a hallmark of addiction, and to overwhelm this harmful defense mechanism there needs to be a concerted, united and intense front of opposition. Basically, when everyone the person cares about tells them in one session how much damage the drinking or drugging is doing, it can be hard for them to maintain this wall of denial.

During an intervention, every person will participate with a prepared statement concerning how the drinking or drug use is harming the addict and by extension how it harms them. They will have prepared specific examples of when the addict’s intoxication did them personal harm. The addict needs to realize and accept that their drinking or drug taking does not exist in a vacuum, and that when they abuse themselves they also do harm to others that they care about. The goal of every intervention is to have the addict admit to the real extent of the problem, admit that they do need some help and to proceed immediately to treatment that has been prearranged for them.

How to Run a Successful Intervention

The behaviors of addiction often create negative emotions that ripple deep throughout the family, and although all still love and worry about the health and wellbeing of the using addict, intermingled with concern there are often contradictory emotions of anger, of guilt and of shame; and as such an intervention can be a very complex emotional event. You have to do it, but you have to ensure that you do it well. A poorly run, chaotic and emotionally confrontational intervention can do more harm than good, and derail an excellent opportunity for change. Here are some tips to make sure that you get it right the first time, and that you get that person into the treatment help that they so desperately need.

1) Practice Practice Practice

You don’t want to go into an intervention blind. It’s not something that many people will have participated in before, most won’t understand completely how it should run or what they are supposed to do and some may be feeling apprehensive about confronting the addict. For the best chance of success, you need to get everyone together and have at least one real serious rehearsal. Before the rehearsal, contact all participants, explain what is expected of them and ask them to prepare a written statement that includes how the drinking or drug taking has harmed them personally, how it has harmed their relationship with the addict, and how they’ve seen the addict change over time.

Make sure that they include specific examples if possible, as examples lessen the ability of the addict to deny the truth of what is said. You should also ask them whether they are comfortable including an ultimatum. The best interventions combine both the carrot and the stick. Through your loving and concerned meeting of intervention, and through the obvious trouble you have gone through to arrange the event and arrange for treatment, you show your love and concern. The stick part comes in the form of consequences. "Accept our offered treatment, or suffer this consequence from me…"

2) Don’t Get Angry

The addict may have done some terrible things, and a lot of the people participating in the intervention may legitimately feel owed an apology and may feel justifiable anger over past behaviors of intoxication. Remember though, the intervention is not about you and the day of the intervention is a day during which the focus needs to remain firmly on the addict, and not on your personal grievances. If the tone of the intervention becomes negative, angry or overly confrontational, the message can get lost within a defensive and equally emotional response. You sit the addict down and you force him or her to listen to what you want to say. Make sure that your message gets through.

When you maintain a tone of concern and of love, the addict cannot react defensively and they must listen and receive what is offered in the spirit in which it is given. For the best chance at success, everyone needs to keep their cool, say what needs to be said, but say it with love.

3) Everyone Needs to Participate

Since denial is such a hallmark of addiction, for the best chance at success, all meaningful people in the addict’s life need to participate. If there are many significant absences, the addict might continue to rationalize their behaviors. They may say, well, Uncle Bob and Aunt Jean obviously don’t feel the same way that you do, or they’d be sitting here too. The more people get involved, the more powerful the event. Don’t disclude the very young or the very old either. Sometimes the most powerful testimony comes from children, and since they are affected by the behaviors of addiction, they have a right to contribute as well. Those people who cannot be physically present can contribute through phone calls, internet conferencing or through written messages read to the addict during the intervention.

4) Get Professional Help

Hiring a professional interventionist is about the surest step towards running an effective intervention. They will organize fragmented family into a coherent tool towards recovery, they know how to diagnose the extent of the problem and they will ensure that the intervention proceeds as it should and that nothing derails the ultimate goal of getting an addict into treatment. But they are expensive. If you can’t afford the fee, which can be several thousands of dollars for a top interventionist, you can do it on your own and you can, with a little planning and consideration, run an effective intervention without outside assistance.

If you do have the money though, hiring a professional is about the best thing you can do to increase the odds of success.

5) Don’t Delay…Get Them into Treatment Right Away

At best, the bags are packed, responsibilities arranged for and the car full of gas. You don’t want to allow for any barriers to an immediate transition into recovery. There is a real and sometimes brief window of opportunity after the addict agrees to accept help and you want to make sure that you get them into treatment before they change their mind. If they agree to treatment, even if they don’t agree that they need it, they should go. They may well change their tune with a few days of sobriety and therapy. Get them into prearranged treatment as soon as is humanly possible.

A Well Run Intervention is Always Worthwhile

Even if you fail to get the addict to accept of a need for treatment right away, they may in time contemplate the weight of the offered testimonies and decide that they do need help after all. However, even if the addict never gets the help they need, interventions empower the family. Nothing will ever be the same again after it’s all laid out on the table…and this is a very positive step towards family healing. Getting things out into the open reduces harmful internalizing and misdirection of blame and guilt. It leads the family back towards cohesive health, and it never again allows for a minimization of the extent of the problem. At worst, you may need to decide how you can live in peace with a still using addict, and draw your own personal and familial boundaries to ensure lasting harmony.

You can’t do it for them, and if they refuse to go even after a well run, concerned and loving intervention; then at least you know that you’ve done all that you can…thankfully, most of the time it does work.

What is an Intervention?

During an intervention, all family and close friends (and any other people of influence in the addict’s life) will joint together to confront the addict in a unified and structured manner. Denial is a hallmark of addiction, and to overwhelm this harmful defense mechanism there needs to be a concerted, united and intense front of opposition. Basically, when everyone the person cares about tells them in one session how much damage the drinking or drugging is doing, it can be hard for them to maintain this wall of denial.

During an intervention, every person will participate with a prepared statement concerning how the drinking or drug use is harming the addict and by extension how it harms them. They will have prepared specific examples of when the addict’s intoxication did them personal harm. The addict needs to realize and accept that their drinking or drug taking does not exist in a vacuum, and that when they abuse themselves they also do harm to others that they care about. The goal of every intervention is to have the addict admit to the real extent of the problem, admit that they do need some help and to proceed immediately to treatment that has been prearranged for them.

How to Run a Successful Intervention

The behaviors of addiction often create negative emotions that ripple deep throughout the family, and although all still love and worry about the health and wellbeing of the using addict, intermingled with concern there are often contradictory emotions of anger, of guilt and of shame; and as such an intervention can be a very complex emotional event. You have to do it, but you have to ensure that you do it well. A poorly run, chaotic and emotionally confrontational intervention can do more harm than good, and derail an excellent opportunity for change. Here are some tips to make sure that you get it right the first time, and that you get that person into the treatment help that they so desperately need.

1) Practice Practice Practice

You don’t want to go into an intervention blind. It’s not something that many people will have participated in before, most won’t understand completely how it should run or what they are supposed to do and some may be feeling apprehensive about confronting the addict. For the best chance of success, you need to get everyone together and have at least one real serious rehearsal. Before the rehearsal, contact all participants, explain what is expected of them and ask them to prepare a written statement that includes how the drinking or drug taking has harmed them personally, how it has harmed their relationship with the addict, and how they’ve seen the addict change over time.

Make sure that they include specific examples if possible, as examples lessen the ability of the addict to deny the truth of what is said. You should also ask them whether they are comfortable including an ultimatum. The best interventions combine both the carrot and the stick. Through your loving and concerned meeting of intervention, and through the obvious trouble you have gone through to arrange the event and arrange for treatment, you show your love and concern. The stick part comes in the form of consequences. "Accept our offered treatment, or suffer this consequence from me…"

2) Don’t Get Angry

The addict may have done some terrible things, and a lot of the people participating in the intervention may legitimately feel owed an apology and may feel justifiable anger over past behaviors of intoxication. Remember though, the intervention is not about you and the day of the intervention is a day during which the focus needs to remain firmly on the addict, and not on your personal grievances. If the tone of the intervention becomes negative, angry or overly confrontational, the message can get lost within a defensive and equally emotional response. You sit the addict down and you force him or her to listen to what you want to say. Make sure that your message gets through.

When you maintain a tone of concern and of love, the addict cannot react defensively and they must listen and receive what is offered in the spirit in which it is given. For the best chance at success, everyone needs to keep their cool, say what needs to be said, but say it with love.

3) Everyone Needs to Participate

Since denial is such a hallmark of addiction, for the best chance at success, all meaningful people in the addict’s life need to participate. If there are many significant absences, the addict might continue to rationalize their behaviors. They may say, well, Uncle Bob and Aunt Jean obviously don’t feel the same way that you do, or they’d be sitting here too. The more people get involved, the more powerful the event. Don’t disclude the very young or the very old either. Sometimes the most powerful testimony comes from children, and since they are affected by the behaviors of addiction, they have a right to contribute as well. Those people who cannot be physically present can contribute through phone calls, internet conferencing or through written messages read to the addict during the intervention.

4) Get Professional Help

Hiring a professional interventionist is about the surest step towards running an effective intervention. They will organize fragmented family into a coherent tool towards recovery, they know how to diagnose the extent of the problem and they will ensure that the intervention proceeds as it should and that nothing derails the ultimate goal of getting an addict into treatment. But they are expensive. If you can’t afford the fee, which can be several thousands of dollars for a top interventionist, you can do it on your own and you can, with a little planning and consideration, run an effective intervention without outside assistance.

If you do have the money though, hiring a professional is about the best thing you can do to increase the odds of success.

5) Don’t Delay…Get Them into Treatment Right Away

At best, the bags are packed, responsibilities arranged for and the car full of gas. You don’t want to allow for any barriers to an immediate transition into recovery. There is a real and sometimes brief window of opportunity after the addict agrees to accept help and you want to make sure that you get them into treatment before they change their mind. If they agree to treatment, even if they don’t agree that they need it, they should go. They may well change their tune with a few days of sobriety and therapy. Get them into prearranged treatment as soon as is humanly possible.

A Well Run Intervention is Always Worthwhile

Even if you fail to get the addict to accept of a need for treatment right away, they may in time contemplate the weight of the offered testimonies and decide that they do need help after all. However, even if the addict never gets the help they need, interventions empower the family. Nothing will ever be the same again after it’s all laid out on the table…and this is a very positive step towards family healing. Getting things out into the open reduces harmful internalizing and misdirection of blame and guilt. It leads the family back towards cohesive health, and it never again allows for a minimization of the extent of the problem. At worst, you may need to decide how you can live in peace with a still using addict, and draw your own personal and familial boundaries to ensure lasting harmony.

You can’t do it for them, and if they refuse to go even after a well run, concerned and loving intervention; then at least you know that you’ve done all that you can…thankfully, most of the time it does work.

How to Find a Rehab You Can Afford

How much will it cost, where can I go, who can I trust and what can I do if I don’t have any money… but really need some help?

Although making the decision to get professional help takes you a giant step forward to getting better, even after you have committed to change the difficulties involved in selecting an appropriate and affordable service provider can easily overwhelm; and the sad fact is that far too many people who do want to get help just get discouraged by the high costs, the waiting lists and the sales pitches from private clinics who may or may not have your best interests in mind.

Here is a step by step guide that you may use to help you to better understand your options, and get you started in narrowing down the available and affordable providers in your area.

In broad terms, your drug and alcohol rehab options may be subdivided into 4 distinct categories.

  1. Private or non profit but expensive drug and alcohol rehabs.
  2. State run rehabs or state funded slots in a program.
  3. Low cost drug or alcohol rehabs that do not require state funding or Medicaid
  4. Totally free drug and alcohol rehabs and sober living environments, many Christian in nature, but a good number of secular options as well.

There is some truth in the saying "you get what you pay for" and in general, the higher the cost of the rehab the more comfortable the facilities, the shorter the waiting period and the greater intensity in group and individual therapy as offered. There are however some real lemons in all price ranges, and you do want to ensure that any rehab under consideration enjoys a good reputation for services provided.

How to Find a Rehab

In general, you should approach this list as 1-4 in order of desirability and action. If you have good private insurance, use it and get the best; it’s well worth it. If you can access state funded treatment and the waiting list is acceptable, you may get high quality free care including medical detox. If you can’t access state funded care or the wait is just too long, find a private rehab in your area that offers very low cost care, and get into treatment quickly. If you can’t access state care, have no insurance, have no money to pay for any form of treatment…you can still get care and get it soon, look into totally free rehabs and long term care facilities as a last option. Whatever you do, get help and get it quickly. Any form of residential treatment is far preferable to months or years of continuing abuse.

1) If You Have Private Health Insurance…Use It!

This is what you’ve been paying towards all those yeas, and you are entitled to coverage for your medically necessary treatment. The degree of coverage as offered varies greatly between companies and even between coverage plans, but as a first step, you need to call you insurance provider and find out just how much you are entitled to. If your policy information is dated, you should not rely solely on your at home resource materials. There have been some legislative changes for the better over the past years and you may be covered for more than you think you are. You may be covered for all or nearly all of the cost of a private residential facility; and if this is the case you could be getting care tomorrow at a top quality facility. Even if your insurance company will pay for a substantial portion of the costs, you don’t want to waste your energy, time and hope at a substandard facility.

Please feel free to contact us at www.ChooseHelp.com for recommendations or help in selecting a quality private rehab in your area. You may find that your insurance provider will only cover a portion of your care and that to enroll in a quality private rehab you will need to contribute a substantial amount of money. No one enjoys paying for care, but if you can afford it, if you can get reasonable credit to finance your stay, or if you can borrow the money from family; you may want to consider your contribution as a worthy investment in your future health and happiness.

It can be pretty expensive, but then again, so are drugs and alcohol; and if you factor in the savings from abuse, the savings of better health, and the likelihood that you will excel in your career once sober, getting better always makes good financial sense…whatever the initial cost.

2) Your State Addictions Agency is there to Help

If you have no private health insurance and lack the means for expensive private rehab facility self payments, your first step towards care should be contacting your local county mental health and addictions services board.

Even if you do not currently qualify for Medicaid, if you lack insurance coverage, and meet certain low income criteria, you may be eligible for free or very low cost local care. Some publicly funded facilities provide an excellent standard of care, but in general, due to funding limitations you cannot expect the same degree of privacy and comfort, of individual therapies and of quick entry as with private care. Many people will qualify for state funded rehab slots but because of high demand, the waiting period for services can be long.

Still, it’s very much worth a couple of phone calls and a trip to your county health office to find out if you are eligible for state funded care.

3) Low-cost community or private care

If you have no private insurance and do not qualify for state funding, or do qualify, but don’t want to wait for weeks or months for care, your next step would be to contact local low-cost residential rehabilitation programs in your area. Many base their fee assessment on a sliding scale of income, and will work with you to ensure that you can get the care you need at a price you can afford, and many self mandate that no one be turned away for financial reasons.

The majority of facilities in this sector fall into either Christian rehab care or long term sober living residences and both may be a good fit for you. Christian programs may offer very low cost care to those in need, and sober living homes may not require any money up front, and only demand that after a specified period you gain employment and contribute a low monthly rent to the maintenance of the house. You may also find a local residential rehab in your area offering services at a full price of less than $1000 per week, with fee discounts available based on need. Please see the list of state facilities in your area for details. If you cannot find a suitable facility in your area, the local Church, Mosque or Temple can be a great resources for low cost options, and your Pastor, Imam, Priest or Rabbi will very likely know of local faith based low cost rehabs.

4) Totally free care

For those in real need, and for those without the ability to pay anything towards the cost of their care, their still exist hundreds of completely free residential rehab programs. The Salvation Army runs almost 200 long term rehab programs nation wide without asking a penny, and the Union and Baptist Missions run a similar number. Most will ask a long term commitment to care and most will have structured and strict rules of conduct, but they act only out of a desire to serve and out of real experience towards your recovery. Some programs may have waiting lists, but in general these waiting periods are far shorter than for comparable free care within state funded rehabs, and you may not need wait at all for entry into a program. Most free care providers will demand that you show a sincere personal motivation to change as a criterion for admission.

Private facilities do not request this, which is fortunate as statistics show that a person’s motivation for entry has very little influence over the eventual success rates.

Contact me if you need help locating a low cost drug rehab in your area. You Can Get the help you Need

Even if you have no insurance, have no money and don’t qualify for Medicaid, you still have hundreds of options available to you, and some of these offer a very high standard of care. If you want to get help…you can. Don’t wait another day before starting the journey to health, sobriety and happiness. It’s not going to be easy, there are no guarantees, and the process can be painful; but the payoff at the end makes it all worthwhile. With sobriety you will perform better at work, greatly improve your health and your ultimate lifespan, contribute fairly to your family and no longer act in ways that make you ashamed, but over which you seem to have little control. You can get better, there is always hope.

Alcohol and Drug Rehab Directory
A directory of reputable and ethical alcohol and drug rehab centers.

How much will it cost, where can I go, who can I trust and what can I do if I don’t have any money… but really need some help?

Although making the decision to get professional help takes you a giant step forward to getting better, even after you have committed to change the difficulties involved in selecting an appropriate and affordable service provider can easily overwhelm; and the sad fact is that far too many people who do want to get help just get discouraged by the high costs, the waiting lists and the sales pitches from private clinics who may or may not have your best interests in mind.

Here is a step by step guide that you may use to help you to better understand your options, and get you started in narrowing down the available and affordable providers in your area.

In broad terms, your drug and alcohol rehab options may be subdivided into 4 distinct categories.

  1. Private or non profit but expensive drug and alcohol rehabs.
  2. State run rehabs or state funded slots in a program.
  3. Low cost drug or alcohol rehabs that do not require state funding or Medicaid
  4. Totally free drug and alcohol rehabs and sober living environments, many Christian in nature, but a good number of secular options as well.

There is some truth in the saying “you get what you pay for” and in general, the higher the cost of the rehab the more comfortable the facilities, the shorter the waiting period and the greater intensity in group and individual therapy as offered. There are however some real lemons in all price ranges, and you do want to ensure that any rehab under consideration enjoys a good reputation for services provided.

How to Find a Rehab

In general, you should approach this list as 1-4 in order of desirability and action. If you have good private insurance, use it and get the best; it’s well worth it. If you can access state funded treatment and the waiting list is acceptable, you may get high quality free care including medical detox. If you can’t access state funded care or the wait is just too long, find a private rehab in your area that offers very low cost care, and get into treatment quickly. If you can’t access state care, have no insurance, have no money to pay for any form of treatment…you can still get care and get it soon, look into totally free rehabs and long term care facilities as a last option. Whatever you do, get help and get it quickly. Any form of residential treatment is far preferable to months or years of continuing abuse.

1) If You Have Private Health Insurance…Use It!

This is what you’ve been paying towards all those yeas, and you are entitled to coverage for your medically necessary treatment. The degree of coverage as offered varies greatly between companies and even between coverage plans, but as a first step, you need to call you insurance provider and find out just how much you are entitled to. If your policy information is dated, you should not rely solely on your at home resource materials. There have been some legislative changes for the better over the past years and you may be covered for more than you think you are. You may be covered for all or nearly all of the cost of a private residential facility; and if this is the case you could be getting care tomorrow at a top quality facility. Even if your insurance company will pay for a substantial portion of the costs, you don’t want to waste your energy, time and hope at a substandard facility.

Please feel free to contact us at www.ChooseHelp.com for recommendations or help in selecting a quality private rehab in your area. You may find that your insurance provider will only cover a portion of your care and that to enroll in a quality private rehab you will need to contribute a substantial amount of money. No one enjoys paying for care, but if you can afford it, if you can get reasonable credit to finance your stay, or if you can borrow the money from family; you may want to consider your contribution as a worthy investment in your future health and happiness.

It can be pretty expensive, but then again, so are drugs and alcohol; and if you factor in the savings from abuse, the savings of better health, and the likelihood that you will excel in your career once sober, getting better always makes good financial sense…whatever the initial cost.

2) Your State Addictions Agency is there to Help

If you have no private health insurance and lack the means for expensive private rehab facility self payments, your first step towards care should be contacting your local county mental health and addictions services board.

Even if you do not currently qualify for Medicaid, if you lack insurance coverage, and meet certain low income criteria, you may be eligible for free or very low cost local care. Some publicly funded facilities provide an excellent standard of care, but in general, due to funding limitations you cannot expect the same degree of privacy and comfort, of individual therapies and of quick entry as with private care. Many people will qualify for state funded rehab slots but because of high demand, the waiting period for services can be long.

Still, it’s very much worth a couple of phone calls and a trip to your county health office to find out if you are eligible for state funded care.

3) Low-cost community or private care

If you have no private insurance and do not qualify for state funding, or do qualify, but don’t want to wait for weeks or months for care, your next step would be to contact local low-cost residential rehabilitation programs in your area. Many base their fee assessment on a sliding scale of income, and will work with you to ensure that you can get the care you need at a price you can afford, and many self mandate that no one be turned away for financial reasons.

The majority of facilities in this sector fall into either Christian rehab care or long term sober living residences and both may be a good fit for you. Christian programs may offer very low cost care to those in need, and sober living homes may not require any money up front, and only demand that after a specified period you gain employment and contribute a low monthly rent to the maintenance of the house. You may also find a local residential rehab in your area offering services at a full price of less than $1000 per week, with fee discounts available based on need. Please see the list of state facilities in your area for details. If you cannot find a suitable facility in your area, the local Church, Mosque or Temple can be a great resources for low cost options, and your Pastor, Imam, Priest or Rabbi will very likely know of local faith based low cost rehabs.

4) Totally free care

For those in real need, and for those without the ability to pay anything towards the cost of their care, their still exist hundreds of completely free residential rehab programs. The Salvation Army runs almost 200 long term rehab programs nation wide without asking a penny, and the Union and Baptist Missions run a similar number. Most will ask a long term commitment to care and most will have structured and strict rules of conduct, but they act only out of a desire to serve and out of real experience towards your recovery. Some programs may have waiting lists, but in general these waiting periods are far shorter than for comparable free care within state funded rehabs, and you may not need wait at all for entry into a program. Most free care providers will demand that you show a sincere personal motivation to change as a criterion for admission.

Private facilities do not request this, which is fortunate as statistics show that a person’s motivation for entry has very little influence over the eventual success rates.

Contact me if you need help locating a low cost drug rehab in your area. You Can Get the help you Need

Even if you have no insurance, have no money and don’t qualify for Medicaid, you still have hundreds of options available to you, and some of these offer a very high standard of care. If you want to get help…you can. Don’t wait another day before starting the journey to health, sobriety and happiness. It’s not going to be easy, there are no guarantees, and the process can be painful; but the payoff at the end makes it all worthwhile. With sobriety you will perform better at work, greatly improve your health and your ultimate lifespan, contribute fairly to your family and no longer act in ways that make you ashamed, but over which you seem to have little control. You can get better, there is always hope.

Alcohol and Drug Rehab Directory
A directory of reputable and ethical alcohol and drug rehab centers.

Take a Step Forwards to a Better Tomorrow

Try typing affordable drug rehab into Google, you’ll get a lot of hits, but you can be sure the first 500 won’t be affordable! The sad reality is that too many people with temporary motivations to get better just get so frustrated and deterred by the stress and challenge of finding affordable care that they just give up.

Even if you have quality and comprehensive private health coverage, you don’t want to waste your time and your hope on a poor quality treatment experience; it’s your life and your health and happiness that are at stake, and you don’t want to make a mistake. If you don’t have comprehensive insurance coverage the situation grows even more difficult. Where can you go for rehab you can afford; who will help you when you can’t afford an expensive up front fee? Recognizing the problems inherent in getting into appropriate and affordable treatment, I have compiled a resource book designed to assist you in understanding your options, your rights and even your needs; and to help you in locating an affordable residential rehab program that’s going to work for you.

Some of the questions that I have struggled with include:

Do I need rehab?

What kind of rehab do I need?

How much does rehab cost?

What type of rehab can I afford?

Where can I go to find low cost help?

How can I get a family member into rehab?

What can family do to help during and after rehab?

Do I need to detox first? What about rehab for my­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ special need?

What are some phone numbers for low cost rehabs in my area?

Where else can I get information on addiction, rehabs and recovery?

I hope you will find the answers to all of these questions and more contained within, and I believe that everyone can find treatment in a timely manner and at a price they can afford, they simply need to know where to look. Please contact me if you need any help in finding affordable care.

You can get better; it will be hard…and it will be worth it!

Try typing affordable drug rehab into Google, you’ll get a lot of hits, but you can be sure the first 500 won’t be affordable! The sad reality is that too many people with temporary motivations to get better just get so frustrated and deterred by the stress and challenge of finding affordable care that they just give up.

Even if you have quality and comprehensive private health coverage, you don’t want to waste your time and your hope on a poor quality treatment experience; it’s your life and your health and happiness that are at stake, and you don’t want to make a mistake. If you don’t have comprehensive insurance coverage the situation grows even more difficult. Where can you go for rehab you can afford; who will help you when you can’t afford an expensive up front fee? Recognizing the problems inherent in getting into appropriate and affordable treatment, I have compiled a resource book designed to assist you in understanding your options, your rights and even your needs; and to help you in locating an affordable residential rehab program that’s going to work for you.

Some of the questions that I have struggled with include:

Do I need rehab?

What kind of rehab do I need?

How much does rehab cost?

What type of rehab can I afford?

Where can I go to find low cost help?

How can I get a family member into rehab?

What can family do to help during and after rehab?

Do I need to detox first? What about rehab for my­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­ special need?

What are some phone numbers for low cost rehabs in my area?

Where else can I get information on addiction, rehabs and recovery?

I hope you will find the answers to all of these questions and more contained within, and I believe that everyone can find treatment in a timely manner and at a price they can afford, they simply need to know where to look. Please contact me if you need any help in finding affordable care.

You can get better; it will be hard…and it will be worth it!

Don’t Enable…Do Help

I hear a lot of true sad stories about people who have had enough of addiction or alcoholism, finally want to get better, but who just don’t have the money they need to get into even the lower cost rehabs right away. They may be eligible for some subsidized care, but with waiting lists as long as two months, this is pretty far from ideal; and a story I get a lot is, "My family has had enough of me, and they won’t help me anymore".

Which I can understand! When we are using and abusing, we tend to do things that force our families away. We burn our bridges, lie, cheat and steal one too many times, and they just get fed up. And they don’t want to enable the abuse either!

And it’s true:

  • When they let us live rent free in the home, getting high in the basement, that doesn’t help us get better.
  • When they give us money for drugs or alcohol when we get desperate…that doesn’t much help either.

They are taught that the only way that they can truly help us to change our ways is to stop enabling, and to start giving a little tough love. And it’s true too, and tough love can help. But tough love gets a little too tough when we finally reach the point when we can no longer deny the extent of the problem, when we accept that things are out of control and when we realize that to have any chance at a better life; we are going to need some help.

When we reach that point and we come pleading for a bit of money for our treatment, turning us away is awfully hard, has nothing to do with enabling or otherwise and just keeps too many of us out of treatments that could really get us up out of the mess we’ve made of things.

We may not deserve it, but we’ll make it up to you once we’re better. You don’t have to give the money to us either, we can understand how that might make you feel a little uncomfortable…pay the treatment center directly.

You won’t regret it.

I hear a lot of true sad stories about people who have had enough of addiction or alcoholism, finally want to get better, but who just don’t have the money they need to get into even the lower cost rehabs right away. They may be eligible for some subsidized care, but with waiting lists as long as two months, this is pretty far from ideal; and a story I get a lot is, "My family has had enough of me, and they won’t help me anymore".

Which I can understand! When we are using and abusing, we tend to do things that force our families away. We burn our bridges, lie, cheat and steal one too many times, and they just get fed up. And they don’t want to enable the abuse either!

And it’s true:

  • When they let us live rent free in the home, getting high in the basement, that doesn’t help us get better.
  • When they give us money for drugs or alcohol when we get desperate…that doesn’t much help either.

They are taught that the only way that they can truly help us to change our ways is to stop enabling, and to start giving a little tough love. And it’s true too, and tough love can help. But tough love gets a little too tough when we finally reach the point when we can no longer deny the extent of the problem, when we accept that things are out of control and when we realize that to have any chance at a better life; we are going to need some help.

When we reach that point and we come pleading for a bit of money for our treatment, turning us away is awfully hard, has nothing to do with enabling or otherwise and just keeps too many of us out of treatments that could really get us up out of the mess we’ve made of things.

We may not deserve it, but we’ll make it up to you once we’re better. You don’t have to give the money to us either, we can understand how that might make you feel a little uncomfortable…pay the treatment center directly.

You won’t regret it.

State Funded Drug Rehab. Problem…What Problem?

I’ve been working hard as of late on a book on low cost drug rehabs, and as a part of this book I wanted to be able to explain how someone would go about claiming any entitled state subsidized benefits The process has been enlightening to say the least, and I can now understand just how frustrated people can get by a system that seems designed to have them fail.

Who you gonna call?

Firstly, who even knows where you’re supposed to go or who you’re supposed to call to find out about state funded programs. The information is there, but it took me a lot of determined searching to find it, and I spend most of my day reading about addiction on the internet!

Did you say 8 weeks?

Secondly, even if you are eligible for state funded programs, you can be looking at a waiting period of up to two months. TWO MONTHS! When you need help with an addiction, you can’t be waiting 8 weeks to get into rehab…you need it now! And it’s not surprising that so many people just get so discouraged by the whole process that they give up, turn back to drugs and don’t even think about getting better again for a long while. I don’t blame any individual working within these governmental agencies, and I’m sure that they are doing their best and working with what they have; but I’ve got to say that the attitude that I got from a lot of these people was that the system is fine, the system is working, and we have everything in place that people need.

Finally, something that makes sense…

I was repeatedly sent to a SAMHSA rehab finder tool; which is quite a good tool in theory. What it is is you go to the SAMHSA web site, and when you finally navigate through the many many options, you find this tool. You type in your zip code, check off what you’re looking for from a list of options and this tool will come back to you with a list of rehab facilities within a few miles of your house.

Sounds like a great thing, and it is…in theory.

I tried it out for New York City, and I did get a number of hits. I was looking for rehabs that stated that they offered sliding fee scale payments, and I got great many that said that they did. Great! I started calling them…the first ten that on the federal government’s treatment locator website claimed to offer sliding fee scale payment assistance, when you actually call them on the phone…have no idea what you are talking about! They take Medicare, which is great if you have Medicare, but if you had Medicare you would probably be getting service through your local state social services clinic already, and wouldn’t need to use the treatment locator.

So if you are looking for low cost rehabs on your own…I feel your pain. State and federal initiatives seem set to work great in theory, and are failing miserably in reality.

Government:

1) Make your websites better! They suck.

2) If you are going to offer web services, give us at least a hope of finding them on the internet.

3) Fix your treatment locator tool. It’s a good idea, but it’s not working, and you just keep sending people to use it.

4) 2 months is not an acceptable waiting time

5) You may say that everyone can get help, I say different.

And the crazy thing is that there are thousands and thousands of rehabs in America that do offer low cost or free care, but unless you have incredible web savvy, or are willing to spend a week looking (I just did) you are not going to find them.

If you do want some help locating a low cost rehab by the way, drop me a line and I’ll hook you up.

I’ve been working hard as of late on a book on low cost drug rehabs, and as a part of this book I wanted to be able to explain how someone would go about claiming any entitled state subsidized benefits The process has been enlightening to say the least, and I can now understand just how frustrated people can get by a system that seems designed to have them fail.

Who you gonna call?

Firstly, who even knows where you’re supposed to go or who you’re supposed to call to find out about state funded programs. The information is there, but it took me a lot of determined searching to find it, and I spend most of my day reading about addiction on the internet!

Did you say 8 weeks?

Secondly, even if you are eligible for state funded programs, you can be looking at a waiting period of up to two months. TWO MONTHS! When you need help with an addiction, you can’t be waiting 8 weeks to get into rehab…you need it now! And it’s not surprising that so many people just get so discouraged by the whole process that they give up, turn back to drugs and don’t even think about getting better again for a long while. I don’t blame any individual working within these governmental agencies, and I’m sure that they are doing their best and working with what they have; but I’ve got to say that the attitude that I got from a lot of these people was that the system is fine, the system is working, and we have everything in place that people need.

Finally, something that makes sense…

I was repeatedly sent to a SAMHSA rehab finder tool; which is quite a good tool in theory. What it is is you go to the SAMHSA web site, and when you finally navigate through the many many options, you find this tool. You type in your zip code, check off what you’re looking for from a list of options and this tool will come back to you with a list of rehab facilities within a few miles of your house.

Sounds like a great thing, and it is…in theory.

I tried it out for New York City, and I did get a number of hits. I was looking for rehabs that stated that they offered sliding fee scale payments, and I got great many that said that they did. Great! I started calling them…the first ten that on the federal government’s treatment locator website claimed to offer sliding fee scale payment assistance, when you actually call them on the phone…have no idea what you are talking about! They take Medicare, which is great if you have Medicare, but if you had Medicare you would probably be getting service through your local state social services clinic already, and wouldn’t need to use the treatment locator.

So if you are looking for low cost rehabs on your own…I feel your pain. State and federal initiatives seem set to work great in theory, and are failing miserably in reality.

Government:

1) Make your websites better! They suck.

2) If you are going to offer web services, give us at least a hope of finding them on the internet.

3) Fix your treatment locator tool. It’s a good idea, but it’s not working, and you just keep sending people to use it.

4) 2 months is not an acceptable waiting time

5) You may say that everyone can get help, I say different.

And the crazy thing is that there are thousands and thousands of rehabs in America that do offer low cost or free care, but unless you have incredible web savvy, or are willing to spend a week looking (I just did) you are not going to find them.

If you do want some help locating a low cost rehab by the way, drop me a line and I’ll hook you up.

Drug Rehab; You Deserve Respect

A lot of us who struggle with addiction do things we are ashamed of, and we feel shame and guilt, and sometimes don’t really believe that we deserve to be treated well. We do, and you should never consider getting help for your disease at a facility that doesn’t treat you with respect, that doesn’t treat your concerns as valid and that doesn’t care for your recovery more than it cares for your admissions check.

Addiction is a disease, and medically recognized as such by all major medical organizations, and although we may start down the road to dependency with willful consumption, once addicted we truly do lose control over our actions and even our thoughts. Although we are legally responsible for what we do, once addicted our moral compass cannot often withstand the pulls to drug or alcohol use regardless of what may stand in our way. No one who experiments with a bit of cocaine at a party ever imagines themselves stealing from loved ones, no one who enjoyed beers under the bleachers in high school ever imagined the pain of an alcoholic DUI and no one who enjoyed prescribed pain pills a little too much would have believed the lies they would tell to get the drugs they needed.

Our actions while addicted are not who we are, and we deserve the same quality of treatment as anyone sick with a disease deserves. Respect does not disallow tough and confrontational treatments if that’s what’s required, but only if done for a reason, and not simply because they can be done, or because we don’t deserve better. Respect starts even before we enter into treatment, and when calling around and trying to choose a facility for your care, you deserve to be treated well, given the information you need to make an educated decision, and never as a burden or a bother.

If you are treated as such before you even enter into residence, you cannot expect better once under their care, and in fact you should expect worse. You have value, and your potential exists just below the surface of addiction and despair, and however low you may have sunk, you are only a month away from your former self. Make sure you receive care at a facility that’s going to treat you well; it’s the least you deserve.

A lot of us who struggle with addiction do things we are ashamed of, and we feel shame and guilt, and sometimes don’t really believe that we deserve to be treated well. We do, and you should never consider getting help for your disease at a facility that doesn’t treat you with respect, that doesn’t treat your concerns as valid and that doesn’t care for your recovery more than it cares for your admissions check.

Addiction is a disease, and medically recognized as such by all major medical organizations, and although we may start down the road to dependency with willful consumption, once addicted we truly do lose control over our actions and even our thoughts. Although we are legally responsible for what we do, once addicted our moral compass cannot often withstand the pulls to drug or alcohol use regardless of what may stand in our way. No one who experiments with a bit of cocaine at a party ever imagines themselves stealing from loved ones, no one who enjoyed beers under the bleachers in high school ever imagined the pain of an alcoholic DUI and no one who enjoyed prescribed pain pills a little too much would have believed the lies they would tell to get the drugs they needed.

Our actions while addicted are not who we are, and we deserve the same quality of treatment as anyone sick with a disease deserves. Respect does not disallow tough and confrontational treatments if that’s what’s required, but only if done for a reason, and not simply because they can be done, or because we don’t deserve better. Respect starts even before we enter into treatment, and when calling around and trying to choose a facility for your care, you deserve to be treated well, given the information you need to make an educated decision, and never as a burden or a bother.

If you are treated as such before you even enter into residence, you cannot expect better once under their care, and in fact you should expect worse. You have value, and your potential exists just below the surface of addiction and despair, and however low you may have sunk, you are only a month away from your former self. Make sure you receive care at a facility that’s going to treat you well; it’s the least you deserve.