The Truth About Ultram Addiction

Ultram, although not a narcotic, is very addictive, and the withdrawal sure felt a lot to me like any other opiate withdrawal. I would recommend anyone thinking about taking this drug to do some internet research, and get informed about the real risks associated with Ultram.

Ultram, also sold as Tramadol, and when mixed with acetaminophen, as Ultracet, is a touted "non addictive" non narcotic painkiller, that is currently unrestricted, and easily bought over the internet. Although my doctor assured me that this medication was not habit forming, I never the less managed to develop a serious addiction to the stuff, and the withdrawal from Ultram sure felt just as real as withdrawal from Vicodin.

Not Addictive!?!?!

Ultram is not technically a narcotic, but it is a Mu opioid antagonist, and does elicit much of the same pleasurable high as a traditional opiate; and as a result is very addictive when taken at more than the recommended dosage. Although the medical community still does not recognize this medication as addictive, a quick internet search reveals huge communities of people exchanging messages of hope, and stories of severe addictions to this theoretically non addictive substance, with many people saying that this drug seems to be even more addictive than many of the traditional opiate type drugs, and the withdrawal pains are just as bad if not worse, and the withdrawal longer.

Unfortunately, the medical community seems to be reluctant to acknowledge the abuse potential of this medication, and as such this drug can still be easily purchased through any online pharmacy without the need for a prescription, and most doctors will prescribe the medication without nearly the thought they would give to a prescription for any of the scheduled drugs. I didn’t even realize how hopelessly addicted I was to this medication until I tried to stop. I had been taking the pills in response to a work injury that left me with severe but not unmanageable back pain, and I was taking 8-50 mg Ultram daily, which is still within the daily range of acceptable dosages.

The Seduction of Tramadol Abuse

Unfortunately, I was not taking the drug only for pain control, and truth be told I never found that it worked all that well for that, but I loved the feeling of wellbeing this drug gave me. Not high exactly, but they just put me in a really great mood, improved my concentration, and perversely, even gave me tons of energy. I really loved the way these pills made me feel, and as a result, took more than I strictly needed, just to enjoy the great feelings the pills gave me; 2 in the morning, one a few hours later, and then a whack of five in the early evening, to really enjoy myself at the end of the day.

I was planning a long trip abroad, and I was worried about the sheer numbers of pills I would need to be taking through international customs, and so I decided I should probably try to stop. I came down with a bad cold, and I had run out of pills, and as such I figured it was as good a time as any to get off of the drug. A few hours later I was shaking, I had incredibly intense leg jumpiness (which is a lot more unpleasant than it sounds), I hurt everywhere, I felt nauseous, and I had sweats and cold flashes. In short, I was in agony. Realizing just how addicted I was, I jumped in the car, and started looking for overnight pharmacies…alas I had left it too late, and was forced to wait until 8 in the morning before finally finding some early rising pharmacist cracking the door, and I was inside in seconds getting a refill on my prescription.

I had the pills in my mouth before getting back to my car, and by the time I got home, I was already feeling much better. I know how desperate I must have looked, and I just didn’t care…I needed those pills very badly. So this was a bit of a wake up call to me. I figured I had become dependent, but the scale of my addiction and the intensity of the withdrawal shocked and scared me. I later learned that what I had tried to do was in fact dangerous, and to try to go cold turkey off of Ultram greatly increases the risks of seizures.

I spoke with my doctor about my experience, and although he conceded that the drug could be "habit forming" he seemed very skeptical about my experienced reaction. He recommended tapering down by a pill a week, and that’s what I did, although after reading a lot on the internet, I actually reduced my dosage even slower than that. It ended up taking me a number of months to really get clean, and get off of these pills. The thing about Ultram that makes them so seductive, at least to me, is that I always felt completely functional while taking the pills; I just felt great, and I could go all day, and enjoy whatever mundane tasks I was assigned. Hanging the laundry was as enjoyable as watching a movie and I had the energy to keep going and keep bopping around all day long. I woke up each morning feeling pretty lethargic, but a couple of pills and a coffee, and a half an hour later I was ready to face the world.

Of course I seemed to pay a price for this when I ultimately tried to get clean off of the pills, and the depression and anxiety I felt during this period was significant, and certainly made me regret my period of artificial happiness. My advice to anyone considering the drug is to think very carefully about the risks involved, and don’t listen solely to assurances within the medical community of the safety and low abuse potential. Do a bit of internet research, and take a look at the thousands of personal shared experiences that tell a very different story. If you do take it, make sure you don’t exceed the recommended dosage, and make sure you take the occasional day off from the meds; probably at least one complete drug free day a week.

These pills are a lot of fun, but getting off of them is truly agony. Be very careful with "non addictive" Ultram.

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Ultram, although not a narcotic, is very addictive, and the withdrawal sure felt a lot to me like any other opiate withdrawal. I would recommend anyone thinking about taking this drug to do some internet research, and get informed about the real risks associated with Ultram.

Ultram, also sold as Tramadol, and when mixed with acetaminophen, as Ultracet, is a touted "non addictive" non narcotic painkiller, that is currently unrestricted, and easily bought over the internet. Although my doctor assured me that this medication was not habit forming, I never the less managed to develop a serious addiction to the stuff, and the withdrawal from Ultram sure felt just as real as withdrawal from Vicodin.

Not Addictive!?!?!

Ultram is not technically a narcotic, but it is a Mu opioid antagonist, and does elicit much of the same pleasurable high as a traditional opiate; and as a result is very addictive when taken at more than the recommended dosage. Although the medical community still does not recognize this medication as addictive, a quick internet search reveals huge communities of people exchanging messages of hope, and stories of severe addictions to this theoretically non addictive substance, with many people saying that this drug seems to be even more addictive than many of the traditional opiate type drugs, and the withdrawal pains are just as bad if not worse, and the withdrawal longer.

Unfortunately, the medical community seems to be reluctant to acknowledge the abuse potential of this medication, and as such this drug can still be easily purchased through any online pharmacy without the need for a prescription, and most doctors will prescribe the medication without nearly the thought they would give to a prescription for any of the scheduled drugs. I didn’t even realize how hopelessly addicted I was to this medication until I tried to stop. I had been taking the pills in response to a work injury that left me with severe but not unmanageable back pain, and I was taking 8-50 mg Ultram daily, which is still within the daily range of acceptable dosages.

The Seduction of Tramadol Abuse

Unfortunately, I was not taking the drug only for pain control, and truth be told I never found that it worked all that well for that, but I loved the feeling of wellbeing this drug gave me. Not high exactly, but they just put me in a really great mood, improved my concentration, and perversely, even gave me tons of energy. I really loved the way these pills made me feel, and as a result, took more than I strictly needed, just to enjoy the great feelings the pills gave me; 2 in the morning, one a few hours later, and then a whack of five in the early evening, to really enjoy myself at the end of the day.

I was planning a long trip abroad, and I was worried about the sheer numbers of pills I would need to be taking through international customs, and so I decided I should probably try to stop. I came down with a bad cold, and I had run out of pills, and as such I figured it was as good a time as any to get off of the drug. A few hours later I was shaking, I had incredibly intense leg jumpiness (which is a lot more unpleasant than it sounds), I hurt everywhere, I felt nauseous, and I had sweats and cold flashes. In short, I was in agony. Realizing just how addicted I was, I jumped in the car, and started looking for overnight pharmacies…alas I had left it too late, and was forced to wait until 8 in the morning before finally finding some early rising pharmacist cracking the door, and I was inside in seconds getting a refill on my prescription.

I had the pills in my mouth before getting back to my car, and by the time I got home, I was already feeling much better. I know how desperate I must have looked, and I just didn’t care…I needed those pills very badly. So this was a bit of a wake up call to me. I figured I had become dependent, but the scale of my addiction and the intensity of the withdrawal shocked and scared me. I later learned that what I had tried to do was in fact dangerous, and to try to go cold turkey off of Ultram greatly increases the risks of seizures.

I spoke with my doctor about my experience, and although he conceded that the drug could be "habit forming" he seemed very skeptical about my experienced reaction. He recommended tapering down by a pill a week, and that’s what I did, although after reading a lot on the internet, I actually reduced my dosage even slower than that. It ended up taking me a number of months to really get clean, and get off of these pills. The thing about Ultram that makes them so seductive, at least to me, is that I always felt completely functional while taking the pills; I just felt great, and I could go all day, and enjoy whatever mundane tasks I was assigned. Hanging the laundry was as enjoyable as watching a movie and I had the energy to keep going and keep bopping around all day long. I woke up each morning feeling pretty lethargic, but a couple of pills and a coffee, and a half an hour later I was ready to face the world.

Of course I seemed to pay a price for this when I ultimately tried to get clean off of the pills, and the depression and anxiety I felt during this period was significant, and certainly made me regret my period of artificial happiness. My advice to anyone considering the drug is to think very carefully about the risks involved, and don’t listen solely to assurances within the medical community of the safety and low abuse potential. Do a bit of internet research, and take a look at the thousands of personal shared experiences that tell a very different story. If you do take it, make sure you don’t exceed the recommended dosage, and make sure you take the occasional day off from the meds; probably at least one complete drug free day a week.

These pills are a lot of fun, but getting off of them is truly agony. Be very careful with "non addictive" Ultram.

6 thoughts on “The Truth About Ultram Addiction”

  1. hey i have been taking tramadol for a few yrs , i was just wondering how you stopped it on your own?? ive tryed and ill wake up in am soooo depressed i feel owful, did you taper off of it? thanks

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  2. i just quit (ran out)yesterday and i really don’t think i can do this. i can’t talk to anybody about this.

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  3. I have been taking tramadol for about a year non-stop. My girlfriend and I took off for an overnight stay yesterday. When we had almost reached our destination, I realized that I had left my medication behind. I had taken my morning dose and it was now about five in the afternoon. Initially , panic set in because I did not want to be without it. Long story short, I spent a very miserable night shaking with chills, hot flashes, total body aches, restless legs, an inability to sleep, and general flu-like misery. Well folks, this isn’t the fybramyalgia that I was prescribed this medication for, this is withdrawal from a non-opiate drug wich I was told was non-habit forming and a response to my request for such a drug. Right now I am really ticked-off and very concerned for what lies ahead.

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  4. I’m at about the 6 pill a day range myself and have started looking around the internet for advice on getting off of them. Of all the things I’ve read, this is one of the most straight-forward descriptions. Most focus on people with severe pain which is why I started taking them initially, but certainly not now. The pain has nothing to do with it at this point. It really is a great general and mild euphoria, but every time I’ve tried to stop I’ve been unsuccessful. It’s just too much fun to take a few before dinner and a glass of wine. Anyways, agree 100% – think hard before starting on these and don’t believe that they aren’t both physically and psychologically addicting. And I’ve had a LOT of experience with drugs – these little buggers are the trickiest I’ve ever dealt with.

    Like

  5. Am on my second day of trying to wean off this beast of a drugs–does it get any better my biggest pitfalls are anxiety–wanting to die–preoccupation with how to die/do it and insomnia…Being depreesed is killing me so I juswt need to know if it/I will ever get better

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  6. hi i really like what you had to say and i will join in with you about what the doctors say i have taken this med for about a year now and quit cold turkey 3 days ago i hope i am almost done there is a very strong need to go to the doctor.thanks

    Like

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